Archive for the ‘Using visual supports for autism’ Category

Using visual supports for autism

Monday, February 20th, 2012

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and that speech/language is secondary.

It is therefore believed that for children with autism information and teaching that is VISUAL WILL be far easier for them to understand.

 Using visual supports for autism is therefore beneficial. There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant ARE social stories, PECS, communication picture cards, visual timetables and so on…

Using visual supports for autism WILL help you to teach social skills and address communication difficulties as well as helping to OVERCOME many of the difficulties the child with autism is struggling with.

Social skills stories ARE an important visual intervention strategy which was first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help OVERCOME communication difficulties for children with autism.

Since then the social story has developed and is now probably the most significant support for autism. The social skills story WILL help address the child’s social skills deficits.

All children with autism HAVE social skills deficits these ARE common to autism, but will vary between individuals. Social skills deficits affect how the child with autism processes information, acts, re-acts, behaves and thinks as well processes sensory stimuli and sensation.

The social skills story is a short descriptive piece of text that can act like a visual plan or framework of the skill detailing visually what is happening and what the child with autism CAN expect.

A social skills story WILL always be written from the child’s own perspective and WILL normally always be written in first person text. The social skills story should break the skill into smaller sections much like a comic script and answer the “wh” questions  – who, what, where, why and when as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Typically social stories are written in word format which WILL make them easier to personalize and edit, no two children are ever going to be the same and we all USE different terminology with our kids, therefore the need for editing is important.

For kids with ASD social awareness skills ARE difficult to master but by using visual supports for autism this can be addressed quite simply, which CAN help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they would once struggle with.

To learn more about how kids with ASD can cope with social awareness skills using supports for autism such as social stories and communication picture cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocalstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills