Archive for the ‘sensory processing issues’ Category

Prepare for Halloween with an autistic child

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

For typically developing children Halloween can be an enormous amount of fun!

However for an autistic child Halloween CAN BE the exact opposite.

Most children on the spectrum have sensory processing issues which can make them sensitive to stimuli, for example sensory processing issues will affect:,

Touch

Taste

Smell

Feel

And Noise

Having social skills deficits is a common characteristic of autism; social skills deficits affect social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours, which CAN make Halloween difficult for the autistic child to understand.

Halloween with your autistic child can now be a whole lot more fun

How?

There are ways to prepare for Halloween with an autistic child, many parents USE supports like visual social story cards and social skills stories for Halloween.

Social stories for Halloween: Are short descriptive stories which CAN explain a skill or situation through images and short descriptive sentences. The social skills story CAN HELP make Halloween less stressful and confusing.

For example: You could try to prepare for Halloween with an autistic child – Give your child with autism a social skills story to practise the trick or treat conversation with.

Have another child or adult help you and practise using the social skills story – them ringing the bell, have somebody open the door and let your child with autism ask trick or treat. The social skills story will help give your autistic child gentle prompts of their own behaviour and what they will need to say and do while trick and treating.

You could try practicing for Halloween with your autistic child by using a story to help them practise taking the candy offered and saying thank you.

Halloween with your autistic child can now be a whole lot more fun, download social skills stories for your autistic child Halloween need not be too stressful this year!

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween  to download social stories for Halloween which CAN help with practicing for Halloween with your autistic child.

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

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What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

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PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

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How do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Autism will affects a person’s ability to communicate, socially interact and use their imagination skills it also causes sensory processing issues and behavioral difficulties as well as anxiety and stress.

Any anxiety symptoms in autistic children can become worse when changes, transitions or new skills need learning. For most autistic children even positive or fun changes like birthdays or new clothes can cause sensory processing issues, and trigger anxiety in the autistic child.

So how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Parents, caregivers and teachers can become stressed when changes are looming knowing that the change will no doubt trigger anxiety in the autistic child. Methods for dealing with anxiety in autism are the best course of action.

Parents, caregivers and teachers are finding it helpful to use methods for dealing with anxiety in autism such as social stories and autistic visual aids to prepare the child on the spectrum for the upcoming disruption.

Maybe your child is due to visit the doctor or dentist, social stories and autistic visual aids will prepare your child for the impending visit; they can show who he will see at the doctor or dentist, what the doctor will be like, and what sort of things to expect.

This process can help with sensory processing issues and the anxiety of a change to routine.

Consequently on the day of the doctor visit your child on the spectrum will have prepared and practiced the situation and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Many parents like the idea of introducing change in a positive way: This can be achieved by practicing change. For example, just for practice, give him a little extra TV time instead of homework time one night, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good.

Then step it up a bit by practicing change for example: Change Homework time from after to before dinner. The hardest changes are then introduced swapping for example TV time to chore time. This process can reduce autism anxiety.

Looking at how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Sometimes your child’s doctor may prescribe medications to help reduce autism anxiety. You and your doctor should monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions.

Most parents feel that medication should be the last resort. There are plenty of dietary and herbal remedies available which are equally useful in controlling anxiety in autism.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating and Autism Anxiety Overload in:

The Essential Guide To Autism

social stories

Autistic visual aids

 

 

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child

Saturday, November 13th, 2010

Probably one of the most basic yet essential life skills is hygiene, from going to the toilet to eating habits, hygiene is essential for everyone.

 

Typically developing children will by the age of 5 – 6 be able to use basic hygiene skills like taking themselves to the toilet, washing their hands, brushing their teeth and so on.

 

But for children with autism hygiene can be a confusing and stressful skill to master. Common to autism are social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, making even basic skills like washing your teeth uncomfortable for a child on the spectrum.,

 

It is not uncommon for a child on the spectrum to be six years old before they master using the toilet, this of cause can lead to further problems. While your average three year old child can still fit into nappies it is not so easy to find nappies for your six year old child. Plus if your child with ASD is already attending school, soiling themselves can attract negative attention from their peers.


For many parents knowing how to teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child is frustrating, a lack of support and information can be a hindrance. However as with other social skills hygiene habits and routines can be taught effectively using intervention strategies such as social skills stories.


What are intervention strategies and how can they be implemented?

Intervention strategies are used to help children with autism, they are resources and methods which can be put into practise to help the child on the spectrum learn or cope with a situation, lesson, activity or skill that they are struggling to master.


Parents needing support and methods on how to teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child can use intervention strategies designed to help with this issue. Strategies such as PECS, flash cards, mini schedules and Social Skills Stories are useful intervention strategies which can help do just that.

 

For the vast majority of children with autism learning is done visually, therefore any visual strategies chosen need to be visual. Visual strategies such as social skills stories are perfect for introducing new skills, brushing up on existing skills and as gentle reminders of already learnt skills, changes to routine, transitions and as guides to help with situations or activities the child on the spectrum does not understand.

 

For children with ASD sensory processing issues can make hygiene difficult, social skills stories can ease some of the tension many children with ASD feel when confronted with a hygiene task they are not comfortable with like for example brushing your teeth, or getting a haircut even.

 

Social stories explain visually the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “how” and give an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others, plus detail the consequence of for example not brushing your teeth etc.

 

Visually rich, using first person text and always from the point of view of the autistic person, a social skills story should be short and concise much like a visual plan or role model of the skill or situation the autistic person can understand.

 

The social story should be printable for convenience and editable, no two people are ever the same and we all use different terminology, therefore some social stories need to be tweaked to make them suitable for individuals.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and how they may benefit your autistic child or young person visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for your autistic child can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstoires.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Social story on hygiene and Autism

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential everyday life skill.

 

However for a person with autism spectrum disorder even the simplest of hygiene tasks such as tooth brushing can cause anxiety and distress. For a person with autism spectrum disorder social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common.

 

Generally people with autism have sensory processing issues; are either hyper or hypo sensitive to stimuli – sight, sound, touch, taste or smell. Making a task such as tooth brushing problematic; the cold water, taste of the tooth paste even the nylon bristle of the tooth brush can be distressing.

 

Also a lack of social skills deficits affects how the autistic individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to sensory stimuli and those around them. So for example looking a hygiene and autism, it is not uncommon for an autistic individual to simply not understand the need for hygiene and self care.

 

Generally people with autism live in a ‘literal world’ meaning they fail to see the social rules or etiquette, they will speak literally and really not care much what others may be thinking or feeling, this is not arrogance merely a symptom of autism.

 

Generally, people with autism spectrum disorder lack social and communication skills and need direct teaching. Most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures.

 

Therefore visual strategies like social stories work very well for teaching and encouraging social skills the person with ASD is struggling to master or understand.

 

Consequently, using a social story on hygiene and Autism is beneficial. The social story will help the person with ASD understand the basic need for hygiene and how this is accomplished.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and reactions of others, helping to reduce stress and anxieties.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism can tackle teaching the need for hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist, showering, puberty and so on.

 

Using visual strategies has been shown to work; social stories use first person text and visual images much like a comic strip, as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behavior being tackled, in a manner the ASD individual will understand.

 

Social stories for autism should be editable, printable and easy to implement, need no formal training to use and easy to personalize for each ASD individual.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism will help explain visually the need for hygiene, why and how.

 

To learn more about visual strategies like social stories for autism and hygiene visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For other social stories for autism and hygiene as well as other issues visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Autistic supports

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Most autistic individuals struggle with the everyday common tasks and skills we undertake naturally without any pre-planning or thought in a lot of cases.

 

Due to their social skills deficits and in some cases sensory processing issues many autistic individuals have difficulties with communication, social interactions, imagination skills, as well as repetitive and obsessive behaviours.


Using autistic supports designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face is beneficial.


According to the latest autism treatment research autistic supports like visual support cues, social stories, PECS communication boards, flash cards and visual schedules all play a large pare in the overall development of social and communication skills as well as addressing sensory processing issues.


The latest autism treatment research suggests internet sites run by parents and professionals offering autistic support and other autistic resources can be of great comfort and help to many families struggling with an autistic child.


Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as google.

 

Having a child on the autism spectrum is not easy, many tasks and activities other families take for granted can be a real uphill struggle even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.


Help, is what most families need and readily available autistic supports which they can rely on daily to help them cope with and ease some of the daily stresses.


Help such as social stories, are readily available. What are social stories? The easiest way to describe a social story is just that “A social story” ¦Originally social stories were developed to help overcome communication difficulties.


But today social stories are one of the major autistic resources used to help teach and support individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits and deal with many of the sensory processing issues they face.

 

So what are social stories?. A social story describes the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images to show the skill in small easier to understand steps, a bit like a visual plan of the skills or situation describing it from the autistic person’s point of view in first person language.


A social story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as we as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping individuals with autism get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.


So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.


Site which offer immediate access to social stories for a minimal fee like http://www.autismsocialstories.com are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families of a child with autism and individuals with autism.


Other sites offering social stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Treatment goals autism

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Research into the latest on autism treatment, shows families and teachers support the uses of visual strategies as a means of teaching and supporting social and communication skills in children with autism.


The priority treatment goals autism are to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, achievable using autistic visual supports like social stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.


The predominant characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorders are impairments in an individual’s of social skills, communication difficulties and interaction, along with sensory processing issues, restricted and repetitive activities and interests. This is often referred to as social skills deficits or the theory of mind.


Research shows many parents worry about their child’s ability to make and maintain friendships which often proves difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder.


Probably the main treatment goals for autism are to help overcome social skills deficits – the theory of mind and ease family life and stresses, as well as to help the autistic individual to reach their full potential in quality of life and functional independence.


Achievable with the help of services and autistic visual supports and resources designed specifically to help overcome many of the deficits associated with this disorder. Such as social skills stories specifically designed to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues as well as communication difficulties.

 

Parents report significant improvements in social skills understanding once social skills stories have been implemented.

 

A social story follows a specific pattern of sentence type: descriptive, directive, perspective and control sentences. Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, since then their use has expanded and today they are classed as one of the major autistic resources for teaching and supporting social skills learning.


The latest on autism treatment shows a popular increase in the implementation of social stories to address social skills deficits. Social stories are written in first person text, use visual images or pictures and are short descriptive no fluff stories.

 

The goal of the social story is to help the autistic child better understand a social situation, skills, behaviour or communication skill they are struggling to master or cope with.

 

The situation or skill etc. is broken down into relevant social cues with appropriate images in an almost comic like style to show the autistic child by answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.


To learn more about the treatment goals autism and the latest on autism treatments like social skills stories and visual flash cards, Pecs and so on visit sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids


Visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum

Saturday, August 7th, 2010

For children on the autism spectrum communication difficulties are common. Research suggests that the vast majority of children on the autism spectrum find visual information easier to understand than the spoken word.

Consequently, tools for autism such as visual supports cards and social skills stories are used more effectively for teaching and improving communication in children on the autism spectrum.

It is a fact that visual strategies work best with children on the spectrum. Therefore parents, teachers and other professionals use tools for autism like social skills stories to help address communication difficulties such as asking questions, having a good conversation, calming down and so on.

Social skills stories work well because they are visual, short pieces of first person text in specific patterns of sentence types. Which show by answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

A common issue in children with autism is their inability to process information in the typical manner. This inability to process information in many cases can lead to communication difficulties as well as social blunders.

A typically developing child naturally learns social and communication skills and the ability to read another’s body language and facial expression. Without this ability many children with autism can misread situations and cause harm or hurt feelings without that intention.

Visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum like social stories can be downloaded from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

By implementing visual strategies such as visual support cards and social skills stories you can teach your child with autism social, communication, imagination skills and behaviours as well as address sensory processing issues that are common to autism, like visiting a dentist, tooth brushing, getting a haircut and so on. Social stories are one of the major tools for autism used today, they are editable, can be personalized and printed for ease of use and convenience.

Learn more about visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum like visual supports cards from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Visiting the dentist with an autistic child

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

For many of us visiting the dentist is quite a scary thought which sparks an un-rational fear.  If parents have an un-rational fear, generally children will pick up on this and so the circle continues.


However this is not the case with autism, an autistic child will not generally pick up on their parents feelings and emotions. The ability to read facial expression and body language is missing in children with autism this is often referred to as the theory of mind.


So why for many parents is visiting the dentist with an autistic child so difficult?


Social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common to autism. Autism is a developmental disability affecting an individual for life. Autism affects how the autistic individual thinks, acts, reacts, communication, imagination and how they process information.

 

Therefore looking at why visiting the dentist with an autistic child may be so difficult: The first consideration when taking an autistic child to the dentist many parents face is why do I need to see a dentist? This man or woman wearing a white coat, who expects them to lay in a chair with a bright light shining in their face, while they look into their mouth using strange equipment.


Although you yourself understand why it is important to have a regular check-up and keep your teeth and gums healthy. Your special needs child may not understand what healthy hygiene habits are, and indeed the importance of having healthy teeth and gums.


Finding autistic resources especially designed for autistic individuals that will help you explain the importance of dental check ups and healthy hygiene habits in autism can be difficult. But for many parents autistic resources such as social skills stories are useful for showing and explaining just these kinds of things.


So what do you need to be aware of when taking an autistic child to the dentist? Once you have actually got your child with autism in the dentist…


Your first hurdle could be the bright lights in the reception area, noise are their children waiting in the reception, other patients arriving, chatting, can you hear dentists treating other patients? Is there a buzzer or bell can you hear the receptionist on the phone while you’re waiting, all these small things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


Many autistic children are sensitive with sensory processing issues being common to autism. The mouth is one of the most sensitive areas on your body, so anything being put in or done to their mouth may cause an anxiety trigger for your special needs child.


The feel of the cold instrument entering their mouth, the drill sensation, the water spraying, the taste of the mouth wash or paste, all these things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


The feel of the dentist chair, the rubber gloves the dentist will wear, the bright light above their face, even the goggles they may be asked to wear are these coloured, if so this could also be an anxiety trigger for the ASD child.


Is the dentist wearing perfume or aftershave, the deodorant the nurse or dentist is wearing, the smell in the dentist room, even reception area, the lady opposite you waiting maybe she has perfume on that will trigger an anxiety attack for the ASD child all these things can have an affect when taking an autistic child to the dentist.


Maybe the dentist is not aware of the affects of autism and autistic sensory stimuli. Autism is growing in recognition but a lot of health professionals are still not aware of the affects of autism or autistic sensory stimuli and what they can do to help ease any anxieties.


As well as all these factors, probably the biggest factor of all is actually why…for many children with autism understanding why they are even there, why they need to let the dentist look in their mouth. Using social skills stories will help explain this before you even step foot through the dentists door.

 

It is always a good idea to speak with the dentist before taking your child along, explain the affects of autism, what autism is and how your autistic child reacts to certain sensory stimuli. Explain sensory processing issues and that your autistic child is sensitive to stimuli and how this can be helped while your ASD child is there.


For example is there a private waiting room away from the busy reception area. That could be quieter and less likely to trigger anxieties before they even get into the dentists treatment room.

 

Can the instruments be warmed under warm water before they are used in your child’s mouth can your special needs child bring their own sun glasses along to protect their eyes rather than wear the dental glasses.


That way you can introduce the sun glasses at home before the visit, giving your special needs child time to get used to them before the check up.

 

Do you have ear muffs that could block out the noise of the drill? Ask for the mouth rinse to be plain water.


All these things need consideration before visiting the dentist with an autistic child.


One excellent autistic resource you will need to implement especially before the dental visit is a social skills story. The social skills story can help explain why they need to visit the dentist and some of the things that will happen while they are there. Research shows many parents use social stories to help prepare an autistic child to visit the dentist.


Social skills stories will give your ASD child clear instructions and explanations as to what is happening, answering the “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what showing visually what is happening, what they can expect from others at the time, and what others will be expecting of them.

 

Armed with a social skills story and the other suggestions I have made you can help your autistic child cope adequately visiting the dentist. Social stories are an autistic resource that is used for helping a child with autism cope with many other skills, situations, activities and events that they will come across in their everyday lives, things we take for granted as “normal”. But to an autistic child can be distressing even frightening.


For a carefully planned and written Autism dentist social story visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find more information on social skills stories that will help your child with autism cope with and understand social situations they may be struggling with like for example Autism dentist social story

Social stories for getting a haircut,

Social stories for a hospital visit

Social stories for students and so on


Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get downloads of 100 social skills stories.