Archive for the ‘child on the spectrum’ Category

Social Skills Teaching with Social Stories

Monday, July 9th, 2012

Social skills stories are used for teaching and helping children with autism to understand social awareness skills, social interactions, communication, expectations, how to deal with routine changes, unfamiliar activities and much more…

The social skills story is a brief descriptive story which uses first person text and images/pictures that provide information regarding a social situation.

When children with autism are given information that helps them understand the expectations of a situation, their problem behaviour within that situation is reduced or minimized.

Social skills teaching with social stories provides a foundation/framework for the child on the spectrum to refer to/follow, thus making the situation more familiar. Typically most children on the spectrum will prefer sameness and will dislike unfamiliarity, to this end the social skills story is a real benefit.

By detailing the skill being addressed the social skills story uses images/pictures and short specific sentences which generally follow a set pattern of sentence type: directive – perspective – control – descriptive.

Social skills teaching with social stories typically needs no formal training stories can be obtained for various skills/situations that the child on the spectrum is struggling with from hygiene issues like puberty to going out and school related issues

A social skills story ia an autism resource which addresses the skill/situation by breaking it down into smaller easier to understand sections, using images and text it will answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about how social skills teaching with social stories can be achieved please visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com 

Where you will find relevant information on social stories as well as other appropriate autism resources, such as communication cards, behaviour plans and so on.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Enhancing social skills in autistic children

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

For the vast majority of autistic children social skills ARE either missing or NEED improving.

This is due to the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits, which ARE common to autism to varying degrees

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect how the child on the spectrum acts, re-acts, thinks and behaves.

Methods for enhancing social skills in autistic children ARE generally visual. This is because most children on the spectrum ARE visual learners and thinkers and will tend to use language secondary.

Visual supports for autism such as: social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards etc ARE visual supports which can be introduced simply and need NO formal training to use.

Characteristically children on the spectrum find visual supports for autism beneficial. Social skills stories ARE short descriptive visual supports which describe a skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story looks much like a comic script, using images/pictures and short precise pieces of text. The social story is always from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, using first person text in short sentences.

The social story answers the “wh” questions: who, what, Why, where, and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight wherever possible into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

Social skills stories CAN be used for a wide variety of situations or skills such as: asking questions, calming down, hygiene issues, self-help skills and so on…

For many children on the spectrum visual supports for autism ARE invaluable and can be treated like visual plans or frameworks to help them cope with and learn skills and behaviours which cause stress and anxiety.

To learn more about visual supports for autism like social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards as well as other visual supports visual http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Download and Use Autistic Supports with Your Child on the Spectrum

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

It is common for those with autism to have deficits in social awareness sills and behaviours.  This is due to the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits means the person’s social, communication and imagination skills are missing or not developed sufficiently.

This can cause many difficulties for those with autism, for example lacking social and communication skills can make it hard for them to make friends, ask questions and join in with play.

The majority of children on the autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand. It is therefore a good idea to use visual autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum.

There are various visual autistic supports available like social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum from sites like:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find various supports for autism which can be used effectively and with no need for any formal training.

Autistic supports such as social skills stories are designed to help you teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours that the child with autism is struggling with.

The social story WILL ACT like a visual plan or framework of the skill by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in those with autism.

The social story should be written from the child’s own perspective, in first person text and in a manner the child with autism can understand. It should be use images or pictures to show visually what is happening and why, this is important.

Generally social skills stories are written in word format to make editing easy, none of us typically use the same terminology and no two children are ever going to be the same, so the ability to edit is important.

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the spectrum such as social skills stories by visiting:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will also find picture communication cards and other supports for autism which can be used to help your child on the spectrum cope with and feel more comfortable in situations that he/she is finding stressful or confusing.

 

 

 

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Foster social skills in kids with autism

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Typically kids with autism HAVE deficits in three main areas of development: social, communication (both verbal and non-verbal) and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is because of these deficits many kids with autism HAVE difficulties understanding and accepting the “hidden social rules of everyday life”.

For example a child on the spectrum WILL commonly miss social cues and be unable to interpret body language or facial expression – so it is of no use “tutting” or giving “knowing nod” these hidden social cues WILL usually be missed!

However there are treatments for autism which foster social skills in kids with autism such as social skills stories and picture communication cards.

These treatments for autism ARE normally USED to help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they normally struggle with like for example asking questions, sharing, making friends and so on…

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text written in a set format which is typically first person text and from the autistic child’s own point of view.

Characteristically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they find visual information easier to understand and follow, therefore it is believed and proven through research that children with autism respond better to visual teaching.

Consequently, social skills stories and picture communication cards DO FOLLOW this belief and ARE typically visual.

The social skills story USES images and pictures with short pieces of text to visually show the child on the spectrum what is happening and why.

The social skills story does this by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

The social skills story can be adapted to suit individual needs and abilities and are generally written in word format with NO FORMAL training needed to use social skills stories.

Teachers and parents can foster social skills in kids with autism using social stories and picture communication cards. To gain immediate download and learn more about how these treatments for autism work visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com 

OR

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

What causes autistic behaviour issues?

Monday, February 20th, 2012

To understand what causes autistic behaviour issues it is important to have an understanding of autism.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects how individuals with autism processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts, behaves and processes sensory input or stimuli. The main symptoms of autism ARE social skills deficits in social awareness skills, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is these social skills deficits that ARE the significant factor in what causes autistic behaviour issues. Typically children on the autism spectrum have communication difficulties and may lack the ability to ask or respond to things which their typically developing peers WILL treat as “normal”

For example recess a typically developing child WILL probably enjoy the freedom of recess but for children on the autism spectrum recess may be uncomfortable, stressful and confusing! This may lead to inappropriate behaviour around recess.

For a child with autism the sheer chaos of recess is upsetting, a child with autism WILL prefer sameness, order and routine and recess is none of these things. Children with autism have difficulties in understanding that not everyone shares their interest or feels that same way they do fully.

By taking a look into what causes autistic behaviour issues we can begin to unravel what it is that our own child with autism may be getting upset or confused by. Careful observation of a child with autism CAN help you to determine exactly what is troubling your child.

There are various supports for autism that WILL help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their social skills deficits. Probably one of the most significant of these supports for autism is social skills stories.

These ARE short descriptive pieces of text that describe a situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues. We know that the vast majority of individuals with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and language is used as secondary.

It is important therefore to USE supports for autism which ARE VISUAL like social stories. Social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties focus on a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with and breaks it down into small easy to understand sections using images/pictures and first person text.

The social skills story CAN act much like a visual plan or framework of the skill allowing the child on the spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill. So going back to our recess example earlier, introducing a social story for recess WILL HELP the child with autism prepare for and understand recess. The social skills story can be looked at each day before recess, helping the child with autism feel more comfortable once recess arrives.

The social skills story CAN BE USED for a wide variety of difficulties, such as self-help skills, communication deficits, hygiene skills, behaviours and many more, in-fact almost anything the child with autism is finding hard.

Typically social stories answer the ever important “wh” question – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and WILL offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues

Saturday, February 18th, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties that parents with an autistic child report is their child’s behaviour issues.

It is important to remember that unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum is far less likely to misbehave “just because” and that most if not ALL autistic behaviour WILL happen for a reason an internal or external factor.

Typically children with autism HAVE social skills deficits in three main areas of development: social awareness, communication – both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills, as well as sensory processing issues.

It is these social skills deficits and sensory processing issues which WILL contribute to the majority of behaviour issues in autism.

Managing autistic behaviour issues can BE ACHIEVED through the use of Intervention Strategies.

Intervention Strategies ARE put in place to help the autistic child manage their behaviours and find coping methods for skills and behaviours that they are struggling with.

Intervention Strategies like social skills stories and visual social story cards ARE probably the most significant of the Intervention Strategies for helping with managing autistic behaviour issues.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories written to help children with autism overcome social skills deficits. A social skills story CAN act like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation the autistic child is struggling with.

A social skills story WILL use appropriate first person text and be from the child’s won perspective. It should be written in word format to allow for editing and personalization as this is important for children with autism and we all use different terminology with our children.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties USE visual images/pictures to help show the child on the spectrum visually what is happening making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners this means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about managing autistic behaviour issues using Intervention Strategies like social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find downloads of approx. 100 social stories.