Strategies to teach children with autism

A child with an ASD will not intentionally cause stress or upset anybodies feelings. A child with an ASD will not misbehave or harm simply out of fun or mischief.


Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.


The common characteristics of autism will often make a child with autism appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.


These are not bad characteristics, just difficult to understand. However for parents with autistic children these common characteristics of autism can make life extremely difficult and at times stressful.


Strategies to teach children with autism social and communication skills and behaviours are useful, research does suggest parents report significant improvements in social behaviours.


Having the ability to socially interact and communicate both verbally and nonverbally is a naturally learnt ability in typically developing beings. These skills however are missing in autistic children and need to be taught directly.


Using strategies to teach children with autism such as social stories does show vast improvements in social and communication skills. Social stories are short descriptive stories like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.


Using visual images which most autistic people find easier to understand and first person text the social story breaks the skill down into relevant social cues and shows the individual with autism spectrum disorder what to expect and what others will expect from them.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how using strategies to teach children with autism like social stories will help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories for children with autism

Social Stories are a visual tool used to help teach social skills to children with autism.


Social stories provide the individual with autism an explanation and visual framework of the skill or situation that they may find difficult or confusing.


Research shows that the Social Stories are an excellent visual tool which can be used to help reduce stress and inappropriate behaviours in some children with an ASD. The social story also increases social understanding and has been reported as a good approach for helping children with an ASD to reach their full potential.


The goal of a social skills story is to increase the autistic child’s understanding of skills and social situations they are struggling to master and understand. By making the child with an ASD more comfortable with and in the situation, and suggest possible responses they may receive from others.

 

Social skills stories follow specific sentence types: descriptive, perspective, directive and control. Introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, social stories have grown into a very popular visual strategy that can be used with all autistic individuals regardless of age and ability.

 

Generally social skills stories are written by experts, teachers and parents to help teach social and communication skills to autistic individuals. Social stories can be edited to suit all needs, personalized, printed and are portable making them convenient and easy to use.


A social skills story can be introduced to help deal with any situation or skill that the autistic child needs help with. No formal training is needed to use social skills stories, site which offer support and expertly written social stories can be found using search engines such as Google.

 

Sites that offer social stories for children with autism like http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer support and downloads of social skills stories for various situations and skills for a small fee.


A social skills story should be visual and use first person text, like a role model the social skills story will help with transitions, and changes to routines as well as teach and support social skills and communication difficulties.

 

For more information on this visual strategy visit any of the following sites and find social stories for children with autism

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

Probably one of the major roles a parent plays in their child’s development is teaching their child social skills. For example daily living skills like potty training, interaction skills like sharing, taking turns, and allowing others to talk without interrupting.

 

Typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally by people watching, observing how those around them do things and handle social situations. We don’t really stop to consider how easily our typically developing children can master suitable age appropriate social and communication skills.


However this is not the case for a child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

 

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

 

For a child with an ASD learning social and communication skills naturally is not easy, due to social skills deficits common to all individuals with autism.

 

Individuals with autism do not people watch and fail to recognise some nonverbal communication such as gestures and signs, for example waving goodbye, a thumb’s up or shhhhhh etc.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder need direct teaching of social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Consequently, parents are encouraged to help their autistic youngster learn appropriate social skills. Having social skills deficits may mean your child fails to recognise subtle cues, maybe unable to read body language or facial expression and misunderstand language such as wit, humour, jokes and slang etc…


So; social skills deficits how can you help your autistic child overcome them, many parents use visual supports for autism. This is mainly because children with autism spectrum disorder are normally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and images, which makes using visual supports for autism beneficial.

 

Therefore using visual supports for autism is going to help you teach your autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills. There are various visual supports for autism available, but probably the best know and most affective are social skills stories.


A social skills story is a visual framework that is effective in teaching children with autism social and communication skills. A social skills story breaks the skills or situation down into relevant key points giving explanations of the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into nonverbal communication such as the thoughts, feelings and emotions that may be felt by others.


By using visual images and first person text a social story allows the child on the spectrum to visually identify with the skill or situation making it predictable and routine. Individuals with autism prefer to stick rigidly to routines and can become stressed if routines are altered or changed, social skills stories are ideal for this, they can prepare the autistic child for upcoming changes.


Social skills stories follow specific patterns of sentence types, are editable and printable making them convenient and easy to use. The social skills story can be used to teach most social and communication skills. For example potty training, using a toilet, washing your hands, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, not interrupting, asking questions, making friends, even social situations like visiting the dentist etc..


By breaking the skill or situation down in to understandable pieces, removing all fluff and irrelevant material etc the social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan allowing the child on the spectrum to feel more in control and comfortable. Removing all fear or dread of the unknown, the social story makes the skills or situation predictable just how a child on the spectrum likes things to be.


To learn more about social skills stories and how they are used to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Where you will learn more about…what are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them as well as getting downloads of social skills stories used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism.


Autism and Social Skills

Most individuals with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) find social situations very difficult. As typically developing individuals we learn social skills instinctively from our family, teachers, peers and general environment.

 

Unfortunately individuals with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) are not able to instinctively learn social and communication skills and can sometimes be the subject of jibes, social mistakes and blunders due to their lack of appropriate social and communication skills.


Social stories are used as a treatment of autism to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and develop an understanding of social and communication skills.

 

Social stories are used by parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals working or involved with children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.

 

Social Stories were originally developed by therapist Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, today social skills stories are used more widely as a means of developing social understanding and addressing communication difficulties.

 

A social story should introduce appropriate social knowledge, using first person text and visual images to describe the social situation or skill. It explains the how’s and whys of a social setting by answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what.


A social story should be made up of four different sentence types, descriptive, perspective, directive and control sentences.


Generally children with an ASD are visual thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching an autistic child it is generally easier to make information as visual as possible, that way the child will find the information easier to understand.

 

This is why a good social story will give information through pictures and first person text, each social story provides clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation. The social skills story acts as role model for autistic children, helping them understand and cope with social situations and address communication difficulties effectively.

 

To learn more about autism and social skills, as well as how social skills stories can help children with an ASD visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

For information on autism and social skills, as well as downloads of social stories visit any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Address healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism

Many parents of teenagers with autism worry that they will not “fit in”. This worry is heightened by the autistic teenager’s difficulties in mastering hygiene skills and routines, especially hygiene issues with autism puberty, such as autistic girls and menstruation.

Hygiene skills are essential life skills but for many autistic teenagers developing healthy hygiene habits can be challenging. Consequently direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is essential.

For many parents of teenagers with autism puberty can be very stressful, parents look for ways to explain puberty and teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism. Parents turn increasingly towards autistic supports such as social skills stories, designed to help them deal with this challenging period in their child’s life.


Social skills stories were first developed as a means of communication, but soon grew in popularity and use. Today social skills stories are used more widely to teach social, imagination and communication skills and behaviours as well as a means of communication.


Using appropriate language and visual images, social stories are used as autistic supports for individuals with an ASD and related conditions. The social story provides the teen with autism with a role model of exactly how to master the situation or skill.

 

The social story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, where, why, what and when as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Concentrating on the main key points and cutting out all the frills, individuals with an ASD respond well to autistic supports such as social stories, which relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Consequently many parents of teenagers with autism use social skills stories to teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism.

 

Parents of autistic teens implement social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:


*autism and going to the bathroom

*puberty and autistic girls

*autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant

*autistic girls and menstruation

 

*taking a shower

 

*taking a bath

 

As well as addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism, social stories also help to teach many autistic hygiene issues, all relevant to a healthy lifestyle.

 

To download social skills stories for addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism as well as overcoming healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers you can visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

From this website you can now instantly download 20 social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers and children.

 

Other social skills stories for autistic teenagers dealing with autism puberty, school, friendships and other related issues are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Social stories on other social and communication difficulties can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism

Children with autism do not develop socially in the same manner as typically developing children. ASD (Autism spectrum disorder) is a neurological disorder affecting the way an individual’s brain develops

 

Children with an ASD have difficulty making friends and getting on well with their peers.

 

A child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is far more likely to enjoy unusual interests not shared by their peers, for example an obsession with train timetables, clock mechanisms etc. This can in some cases cause the child to become socially isolated and unable to integrate fully with their peers.

 

All children with autism will have social skills deficits. However the individual’s social skills deficits will vary between children with an ASD, as no two children will ever be exactly the same.

 

Having social skills deficits can make it hard for children with autism to understand how other children are feeling, their emotions, they will be unable to read the other child’s body language or facial expression.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism can be difficult. However with time and perseverance, as well as autism supports like social skills stories this can be achieved.

 

What are social skills stories?

 

A social story is a short story that has been written in a specific style and format. A social story gives information through visual images and text, providing clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.


The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what. Showing visually what people do and why they do it, like a role model for the child with an ASD. This can help relieve anxieties and stress that can surround some social situations, for example making friends, asking questions, sharing, taking turns even respecting personal space, in-fact most social and communications difficulties can be addressed using social skills stories.


In fact the social skills story acts as a prompt for socially acceptable behaviours and can help the child with autism understand situations and skills and show them appropriate responses.

 

The social skills story can help the child with autism prepare for routine changes and new situations, which can help reduce negative reactions and behaviours which stem from a lack of social understanding.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism using social skills stories has already proven successful, today social stories are considered one of the major autism supports and are widely used in homes, schools, colleges and out and about.

 

To learn more about autism supports such as social skills stories visit sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills where you will also find a vast selection of social skills stories which can be downloaded.


Other sites of interest are:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com