Archive for the ‘social stories for autism’ Category

Autistic Supports

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Autistic supports ARE used to help people with autism learn or remember social and communication skills and behaviours.

There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant of the autistic supports ARE VISUAL.

Typically people with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they USE visual images/pictures as their first language and speech/ words as secondary.

Therefore it is commonly believed that the most BENEFICIAL autistic supports ARE VISUAL. For example:

Social stories

Visual social story cards and folders

PECS

Communication cards – flash cards

…And so on…

For the purpose of this article we are looking at SOCIAL STORIES

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports which were first introduced around twenty years ago to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.

Today social stories for autism ARE widely used by teachers and parents to not only teach but re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

A social story is a short descriptive story which looks much like a comic script. The social story WILL describe a skill or situation from the perspective of the child with autism.

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports that use images/pictures to detail what is happening and why. Acting like a visual framework or plan the social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most kids with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate downloads of 100 social stories for kids with autism

Social Skills Teaching for Kids with Autism

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Kids with Autism generally have difficulties with social awareness skills.

Unlike typically developing children that naturally develop social awareness skills through people watching, their peers, parents and the environment.

A distinct lack of social skills can make it difficult for kids with Autism to develop and maintain friendships which in turn could lead to social isolation and in some cases even bullying.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism WILL help provide your child with the tools he needs to understand and function in social situations.

Kids with Autism have difficulties understanding that not everyone will share their opinion, interests, thoughts and feelings, a child on the spectrum will not pick up on social cues from the other person, this can lead to misunderstandings and confusion for the child on the spectrum.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism can help teach your child to recognize the feelings of others.

For example tools like flash cards (picture cards) or social stories for autism can help as an intervention strategy to teach social awareness skills. By using flash cards or social stories for autism children with Autism you can help guide your child in most social situations.

Social stories for autism ARE visual which is important for children with Autism. Typically most children with Autism are visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures, with speech / language as secondary.

The social story looks much like a comic script and acts like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation, such as making friends, approaching people, starting conversations, sharing and so on all skills that a child on the spectrum may struggle with.

The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. They are easy to implement and shoud be editable as no two kids are ever going to be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

Social stories for autism can be used for many different situations and skills
– for example self-help skills, changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and so on. To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Teaching social skills for children with autism

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

There are various tools that can be used to teach social skills for children with autism, probably one of the most significant of these is the social skills story.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories

Social stories are used as a tool for aiding communication and teaching social skills. The social skills story is typically written in first person text, always from the point of view of the autistic child, and will use images to help describe the skill or behaviour in terms of relevant social cues.

The social skills story will provide accurate information, with no hidden extras. Social stories for children with autism answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

The characteristics of autism

A lack of appropriate social skills is one of the characteristics of autism. Many parents struggle daily to teach “everyday” life skills such as appropriate hygiene as well as other skills like making friends and social awareness skills to their autistic child.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories is beneficial. The social skills story acts like a visual framework or visual plan of the skill, helping the child to understand what is happening, why and what is expected of them.

Download: social stories for autism

While many sites offer downloads of social stories for autism, they may not always be colourful, editable and easy to implement.

At http://www.autismsocialstories.com you will not only find downloads of 100’s of well written social stories, the social stories are also colourful, editable, convenient and easy to implement.

To learn more about social stories for autism and how they can benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Visual support social stories for autism

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

 Typically individuals with autism WILL display deficits in social cognition, the ability to think in ways necessary for appropriate social interactions.

How will this affect your child?

 

The theory of mind tells us of the difficulties individuals with autism have in predicting the actions, thoughts, feelings and emotions of another person. This inability can be overcome using visual support social stories for autism which ARE used to help individuals with autism “read” and understand social situations.

Visual support social stories for autism present appropriate social behaviours in the form of a descriptive short story, a bit like a comic script.

Originally social stories were developed as a means of communication. Today, social stories ARE used for a wide variety of situations and skills. The social skills story WILL include answers to the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what allowing the child with autism to interact appropriately with others.

What are social stories?

 

The social skills story CAN help the child with autism practise or rehearse a situation or skill that they ARE having problems with for example asking questions, making friends, visiting a dentist and so on.

Commonly those with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures, and WILL respond better to visual information and instruction.

This concept is followed in visual support social stories for autism, which USE images or pictures to visually explain the skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues, acting like a visual sep by step plan or role model.

Generally written by experts in autism the social skills story will normally follow a set pattern of four sentence types: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control.

As well as being visual the social story can HELP the child with autism OVERCOME many difficulties like puberty for example.

Social stories ARE generally written in first person text and from the autistic person’s point of view, the social skills story should be editable and easy to personalize as no two children with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our child.

If you would like to see an example social skills story and get immediate downloads of social stories for children with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Using printable social stories for autism

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Using printable social stories for autism as a visual plan or framework is a powerful tool for teaching children on the autism spectrum. Social skills stories are visual representation of situations, social skills, behaviours or events that happen in our lives.

 

Children with autism struggle with social, communication and imagination skills; this is often referred to as social skills deficits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism spectrum disorder, but will vary in degree depending on the ability of the ASD child.

 

However social skills deficits are always present, therefore strategies are needed to help teach ASD children methods of overcoming these deficits in social skills.

 

By using printable social stories for autism you can help teach an ASD child a particular social, communication or imagination skill or behaviour that they may find problematic or confusing.

 

For example many children on the autism spectrum struggle with hygiene skills, sharing, taking turns and making friends, using visual strategies like social stories can help much like a role model,  using visual images, pictures and text like a comic strip.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that take a concrete approach to learning which will help ASD children to understand what is being said, how they should react and how to recognize situations that occur that they may be struggling with.

 

By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. Social skills stories should follow a specific formula of sentence types, be editable and easy to personalize as no two children are ever the same and we all use different vocabulary.

 

To find out more about using printable social stories for autism on issues such as hygiene visit:

http://www.autismsocialsories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Social story on hygiene and Autism

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential everyday life skill.

 

However for a person with autism spectrum disorder even the simplest of hygiene tasks such as tooth brushing can cause anxiety and distress. For a person with autism spectrum disorder social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common.

 

Generally people with autism have sensory processing issues; are either hyper or hypo sensitive to stimuli – sight, sound, touch, taste or smell. Making a task such as tooth brushing problematic; the cold water, taste of the tooth paste even the nylon bristle of the tooth brush can be distressing.

 

Also a lack of social skills deficits affects how the autistic individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to sensory stimuli and those around them. So for example looking a hygiene and autism, it is not uncommon for an autistic individual to simply not understand the need for hygiene and self care.

 

Generally people with autism live in a ‘literal world’ meaning they fail to see the social rules or etiquette, they will speak literally and really not care much what others may be thinking or feeling, this is not arrogance merely a symptom of autism.

 

Generally, people with autism spectrum disorder lack social and communication skills and need direct teaching. Most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures.

 

Therefore visual strategies like social stories work very well for teaching and encouraging social skills the person with ASD is struggling to master or understand.

 

Consequently, using a social story on hygiene and Autism is beneficial. The social story will help the person with ASD understand the basic need for hygiene and how this is accomplished.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and reactions of others, helping to reduce stress and anxieties.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism can tackle teaching the need for hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist, showering, puberty and so on.

 

Using visual strategies has been shown to work; social stories use first person text and visual images much like a comic strip, as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behavior being tackled, in a manner the ASD individual will understand.

 

Social stories for autism should be editable, printable and easy to implement, need no formal training to use and easy to personalize for each ASD individual.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism will help explain visually the need for hygiene, why and how.

 

To learn more about visual strategies like social stories for autism and hygiene visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For other social stories for autism and hygiene as well as other issues visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for autism

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Common to all individuals with autism are deficits in social skills. Teaching social skills to children with autism can quite often become a primary focus at school and in the home. Many parents and teachers report success in teaching social skills to children with autism can lead to an increase in the child’s self confidence.

Generally children with autism are visual learners, meaning they think in pictures and will gain more benefit from visual information rather than written, auditory or oral information.

Therefore visual strategies are believed to work best with ASD children. Social stories are used as visual strategies. A social skills story is used to show a child with autism how to perform or understand a certain skill or situation.

A social skills story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction and break it down into smaller easier to understand sections. The social skills story provides details and information that the child with autism can understand this is important because children with an ASD often find social situations confusing.

Social stories for autism answer the “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as give the child with autism an insight into the thoughts feelings and psooible reactions they may expect from others.

The main goal of any social skills story should be to provide ASD children with a role model, a visual plan and framework which will help reduce anxieties and stress for the child with autism.

While social stories for autism are normally implemented to address a particular skill or situation, ASD children can also use social skills stories for autism to deal with other deficits in social skills such as hygiene issues, social awkwardness and communication difficulties.

Common to all individuals with autism is awkwardness with social interactions, such as respecting personal space, having conversations, asking questions etc. Social stories can be used to help deal with these issues.

Social stories should provide information about the feelings of others and the consequences of ignoring those feelings.

Normally written in first person text and using visual images social stories should be written from the child’s point of view with appropriate language. No two children with autism will ever be the same therefore when using social stories you will normally need to tweak or edit the social skills story to personalize it for your own child. We all use different terminology and adding your own personal terminology will help with the effectiveness of the story.

To learn more about implementing social stories and how you can download professional social skills stories today visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Types of social stories for autism

Sunday, June 13th, 2010

Social stories were originally developed twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help with the communication difficulties she encountered while working with autistic children.


Today social stories are used more widely to develop and teach social and communication skills as well as encourage positive behaviours.

 

There are various types of social stories for autism ranging from stories to help with personal issues in teenagers to potty training stories for toddlers.


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and respond better to visual information, rather than written text or information given orally. Research suggests it is because of this social stories work so well.

Social stories present information visually through images and small amounts of appropriate first person text, almost like a comic script. The autistic child is able to follow and use, much like a visual plan, or role model of the skill or situation that they maybe struggling with.

 

Unlike a typically developing child that will learn social and communication skills naturally an autistic child will struggle to understand or pick up on social cues, such as body language and facial expressions. This lack of social and communication skills can often lead to social mistakes and blunders.

 

However using autistic child as a means of teaching social and communication skills to children with autism is a proven technique. Various types of social stories can be used at any one time for example a child may need help in the classroom to ask questions as well as at recess, P.E. lessons and assembly all these situations are dealt with using social stories.

 

At home the child may need help with personal issues like using the toilet, eating with the family and so on again various types of social stories for autism are used.

 

Social stories are normally written by experts in autism and will generally follow a set formula of four different sentence types: perspective, directive, control and descriptive sentences.

 

A social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, what and why) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social skills story may suggest possible outcomes and give positive encouragement to the child with autism.

 

Not all social skills stories will be perfect straight away and may need tweaking to suit individuals, no two people will ever be the same.

 

Social skills stories should be colourful, editable and printable to make them easy to use and convenient. To find out more about the various types of social stories for autism and to get downloads of various social skills stories for autistic children visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

ASD – Autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

With an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with ASD, it is now recognized that autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than disorders such as diabetes, spina bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children diagnosed with ASD will have common symptoms of autism; these are known as social skills deficits or the triad of impairments.  A child’s social skills deficits are characterized by difficulties in:


Social skills development

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills


These deficits are always present in children with ASD to varying degrees.


In addition to the triad of impairments or social skills deficits children diagnosed with ASD may also display sensory processing issues.


Probably the most noticeable of the symptoms of autism is an individual’s difficulty with social interactions. A child with autism spectrum disorder may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.


Typically a child with autism spectrum disorder will not follow the normal pattern of development. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before their child is diagnosed with ASD.

 

For example from birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case.

 

Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication both verbal and non-verbal can prove difficult for ASD children.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder will never develop speech, or speech may be delayed. Generally all individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and benefit form visual aids that can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder using visual aids that teach social and communication skills such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories are proving very beneficial.


For the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct. For example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autism spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Consequently, many children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching is achievable by using visual aids like social stories. Since their development twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used for teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills in children with autism and related conditions today.

 

Social stories are a role model that provide individuals with ASD a visual explanation in the form of a script, much like a step by step visual representation or plan of the skill or situation that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with an ASD.


Giving the individual with ASD accurate information that answers the “wh” questions
(who, where, why, when and what)
as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior.

 

Social stories will help reduce anxieties and stress making them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

How to use visual strategies in autism

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010


Generally children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions tend to be visual learners. They understand what they see (visual) much easier than what they hear (auditory) or read. Therefore, children with Autism Spectrum Disorder benefit significantly from the use of visual strategies.

 

By using visual strategies parents, care givers and teachers are able to address communication difficulties, helping the ASD child interact successfully with those around them.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder interacting with their environment and those around them can prove stressful and confusing.  The ability to understand and read other people’s body language, facial expression and communications is missing in autism.

 

What are the communication difficulties in autism? Firstly the ASD child will be unable to express themselves effectively.  Secondly the ASD child will not understand social skills or cues they will struggle to understand what they are supposed to do or not do.  And can become confused and anxious about what is happening or not happening.

 

For many parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals learning how to use visual strategies in autism has proven beneficial.

 

There are many visual tools available for autism, but probable the most significant visual tools for autism are social stories and PECS cards or flash cards.

 

Learning how to use visual strategies in easy, no formal training is necessary. Visual tools such as social stories for autism can be downloaded, edited and printed to personalize them for your ASD child.

 

Social stories are short visual frameworks of a skill or behaviour that the child with ASD is struggling with. Much like a comic strip conversation, the social story is presented visually with appropriate text always in the first person and from the point of view of the child with ASD.

 

Following a set formula and normally written by experts a social story can be implemented easily and effectively helping communication difficulties and other social skills and behaviours.

 

To learn more about these valuable visual tools and to get downloads of social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com Here you will find information on how to use visual strategies in autism, as well as info on autism and social stories for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.

 

Other sites offering info on autism and social stories for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

Social stories autism

Monday, March 8th, 2010

Social stories are used to help children and adults with ASD (Autistic spectrum disorders) understand and cope with social and communication skills and behaviours they would otherwise struggle to master.

Social stories autism work by breaking down a task or social situation into small easy to understand steps, the social cues.  Normally social skills stories will include visual images or photographs that are relevant to the story. Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, which means they find visual information easier to digest and understand.

Therefore many parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals find social stories for autism an ideal tool when communicating and caring for autistic individuals.

By implementing a social story you can help children and adults with ASD master skills and behaviours they struggle with such as: visiting a dentist, recess, asking questions, respecting boundaries and so on. Daily life skills as well as more complex situations can be broken down into relative social cues, with appropriate images, then by following a specific formula of 4 main sentence types the social story can be implemented that will help target the situation, skill or behaviour.

Social stories are a framework of visual representations and appropriate first person language of a skill. That will not only help those with autistic spectrum disorders, but also other children and adults with related conditions.

To find out more about social skills stories and how they can be downloaded and implemented to help children with ASD and related conditions visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find information on social skills stories and downloads of 100 social skills stories that are all written by an expert in childhood autism.

For many children with ASD social and communication skills are difficult to master, but using social skills stories for autism can help put an end to much of the stress and anxieties they feel.

Get immediate download of social skills stories for autism and related conditions from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Visual Supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

Unlike their typically developing peers children with autism spectrum disorder will display deficits in social and communication skills, this is common in ASD.

 

As typically developing individuals we naturally use communication both verbal and non-verbal, we are able to use expression and body language to show how we feel, what we are thinking and so on. For those children with autism spectrum disorder this ability is lacking.

 

Generally we learn social and communication skills through our environment, peers and family, we use these skills in our everyday lives. For children with autism spectrum disorder using expression and body language is not a natural act. For the majority of children with ASD social and communication skills need direct teaching and nurturing.

 

For children with ASD the world around them is confusing this is due to their deficits in social and communication skills. Being unable to communicate effectively can cause stress and confusion, it is common for children with ASD to become agitated and stressed easily when they can not express themselves or make their needs known.

 

Generally using visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder can help overcome a lot of the deficits in social and communication skills.


Endorsed by parents, care givers and teachers visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder can be implemented quickly and easily helping to overcome a lot of the struggles met by both families and for children with ASD.

 

Generally children with autism are visual learners which make visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder ideal. Therefore using visual supports such as social stories has become significant in the treatment of deficits in social and communication skills.

 

These short almost comic like visual step by step plans for skills and behaviors are always written in the first person following a specific formula.

 

Which was first introduced almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her find and teach social and communication skills to the children with autism spectrum disorder that she was working with.

 

Research shows us that children with ASD respond very well to the pictorial representation in social stories. Images and pictures are powerful re-enforcers for children with autism spectrum disorder, and as such are probably the most significant resource used for teaching appropriate social and communication skills.

 

Visual supports such as social stories for autism are implemented to help with any social and communication skill or behavior that the child with ASD is struggling to master.


Social stories can be used at home and in the classroom with great affect they can be used on their own or with other social stories for autism. To find out more about this valuable autism tool and to gain immediate download visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find 100 social stories for autism all for immediate download that will become useful visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder

 

Visit and download social stories at:  www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or the following site:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

 

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

Â

In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


How to write social stories for autism

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

Many parents of children with autism search for answers that will help them overcome some of the issues relating to autism characteristics and behaviors, an easy answer is social stories can help. What are social stories? And how WILL they help a child with autism improve his social skills and behaviors?

 

What are social stories, put simply they are specifically written step by step plans to help children with autism learn and master skills they otherwise struggle with.


A social skills story is a short descriptive piece of text (story) written for an individual with social skills deficits to help establish and encourage positive social interactions and behaviors.


Due to autism characteristics and behaviors many children with autism struggle to make sense of the world they live in and the people they come into contact with, these difficulties are known as social skills deficits and are common to autism.

 

Social skills stories are written by therapists, teachers and parents of children with autism to prepare them for experiences and changes to routines. Social skills stories can be on issues as varied as tooth brushing, visiting grand parents, recess even visiting the dentist or hairdresser.


Many parents of children with autism, caregivers and teachers create social skills stories to help teach social and communication skills and behaviors within the family and school setting.

 

Social stories are used to help children plan and mange transitions, ask appropriate questions, and calm down successfully.

 

Generally social stories are visually rich giving the autistic child visual cues helping them identify and understand the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced. Visual images in the social story for autism help make the social story’s content and purpose clearer.

 

When looking at how to write social stories for autism these factors should be considered:

 

A Social Story should describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses in a specifically defined style and format.

 

The goal of a social story for autism is to provide accurate information and clarity in a reassuring manner that can be understood by the autistic child or young person.

 

Always written in the first person using appropriate language social skills stories are used as a strategy for most behavior and skills the autistic child or young person needs help with.


To find out more about how to write social stories for autism and gain immediate downloads of various social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Or any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources



Social skills stories for autistic behaviors

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

A major issue for parents of autistic children is their concern that a lack of appropriate social and communication skills both verbal and non-verbal in their autism child will greatly hinder their development and ability to function in a “normal society”

Generally speech is quite often delayed in the autism child but will develop, with the percentage of autism children completely non-verbal being only 9%.

 

Social skills deficits in social and communication skills are common to all autism children. However there are autism treatments that parents of autistic children report provide a substantial improvement in their child’s social and communication skills development, which can help the autistic child develop and fit in with society with less of a struggle.

 

Probably one of the major autism treatments is social skills stories for autistic behaviors. These were first introduced almost twenty years ago to help facilitate social and communication issues reducing stress and anxieties in the autistic child or adult.


Significant numbers of parents of autistic children, care givers and teachers report that the use social stories to teach social and communication skills greatly improves positive behaviors and helps the autistic child reach his/her full potential socially.

 

There are many sites run by experts in autism offering autism treatments such as social skills stories for autistic behaviors, one such site is: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Social skills stories are now probably one of the major coping techniques for autistic behaviors used by parents of autistic children to help re-enforce skills and behaviors to the child with autism from everyday skills such as asking questions, listening and being a good sport to more complex skills and behaviors like, calming down, appropriate touching and lying.

 

Social skills stories are believed to improve social and communication skills in the child with autism plus personal and social development as well as reducing undesirable behaviors.

 

To find out more about social stories for autism as major coping techniques for autistic behaviors visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior