Archive for the ‘autism symptoms’ Category

Autism goals for interaction

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; this can affect how the person with autism spectrum thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

 

Autism impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Typically kids with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on Autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism spectrum disorder and social skills should be taught directly.

 

Generally kids with autism spectrum disorder rare visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; this is achievable using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism spectrum disorder overcome social interaction difficulties.

 

To find appropriate Autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic person’s brain; this can affect how the autistic person thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

Autism impairs the autistic person’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

Typically kids with autism have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic person’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism and social skills should be taught directly.

Generally kids with autism are visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; This is achievable using visual supports for autism such as social stories.

Using visual supports for autism can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism overcome social interaction difficulties.

To find appropriate autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

 

Autism and Social Skills Teaching

Friday, June 11th, 2010

For many parents having a child diagnosed autistic can be a real shock. Having a child diagnosed autistic is more common than you probably thought with 1 in every 150 babies born being diagnosed autistic.


Having a child with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) is not going to be easy. Generally children with autism will display social skills deficits, their autism symptoms. Some children with Low functioning autism may have other developmental issues such as little or no speech, seizures and educational difficulties.

 

With autism symptoms such as high functioning autism and asperger syndrome a child will have average or above intelligence, however their speech may still develop slowly but will develop.


A common thread that is shown in all children with ASD is their social skills deficits.


Having social skills deficits will mean your child will have deficits in

Social interaction skills

Communication skills both verbal and non-verbal

And Imagination skills

 

For some parents coping with their child’s social skills deficits can be very stressful, finding appropriate resources and help to address these issues can also be confusing and difficult.


There are treatments for autism, which help address social skills deficits effectively. Strategies and treatments for autism such as social skills stories help parents, care givers and teachers cope with and address social skills deficits.


Children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, which means that they find information and instruction easier to understand if it is presented visually rather than by text or spoken.

 

Therefore social skills stories which are used as visual role models can be easily implemented and used with good effect. There is no formal training needed to use social skills stories, they can be personalized, printed and used to teach or re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviors.


For many parents of children with ASD a major area of concern is their child’s difficulties with social development, for example parents of children with ASD worry their child will struggle to make and maintain friendships and generally “fit in”.

 

For a child with ASD social, communication, imagination and interaction skills, are not learnt naturally, these skills need to be taught directly. Consequently, autism and social skills teaching using visual supports like social skills stories is beneficial.

 

Research shows us visual supports for autism and teaching social skills using social skills stories as a strategy has grown over the last twenty years into one of the major treatments for autism used today.

 

Autism social skills stories are short, descriptive visually rich pieces of text which follow a set formula, using appropriate language autism social skills stories are used affectively as a tool for teaching and re-enforcing important social skills and behaviors to those individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Giving key focus to the vital points the social cues autism social skills stories are much like a comic strip, showing a detailed visual step by step plan of the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

For immediate download of autism and social skills teaching stories that will help you teach and re-enforce social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to your youngster visit one of the following sites where you will find autism social skills stories and visual support cards for children and young people with ASD written by experts in autism ready to be downloaded and used:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

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In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


Life after a diagnosis of autism

Saturday, November 7th, 2009

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world; autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders today with 1 in every 150 children receiving a diagnosis of autism.

 

Scientists still have no cure for autism, but strive to find answers to the burning questions what is autism and how is it cured?

 

So as we know it what is autism and how do we cope and move forward with life after a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder? Autism spectrum disorder is a complex set of autism symptoms or characteristics all pertaining to the way a child develops (brain) the autism symptoms or characteristics affect the way a child develops in the triad of autistic impairments.

 

Put simply the triad of autistic impairments are deficits in the way the autism child develops skills and behaviors their social, communication, imagination and interaction skills will be poor and not develop in the normal way.


For typically developing children these skills develop naturally without us needing to really put much thought and effort into their development, for example typically developing children will be naturally inquisitive, will want physical contact, can make eye contact, will quickly learn to point, will crawl, stand, play, and want the interaction of peers and family members.

 

For the autism child these natural skills need to be encouraged and will need direct teaching.

 

Although there is no cure for autism there are treatments for autism that make the life of the autism child much easier and allow them to develop to their full potential. Autism spectrum disorder is not a mental disorder, but that said some kids with autism, those on the lower end of the autism spectrum scale may not develop speech or it may develop late and may display educational difficulties.

 

Generally those kids with autism on the higher end of the autism spectrum scale will be of average to above average intelligence and you may here them referred to as “the little professor” or “geeks”.

 

One of the major treatments for autism that can really help the autism child and parent is social stories. These can help bridge that gap and teach the social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors that the rest of us take for granted.

 

Since their development almost twenty years ago treatment for social skills deficits in autism has moved forward in huge leaps and bounds. Parents, teachers and all others involved in and child’s care can use social stories with the child to help connect and teach skills and behaviors the autism child may not understand or may find stressful.

 

The social stories can be used for all social skills deficits in autism from the very basic like mastering tooth brushing, wiping your nose, to the more complex like making friends, controlling behaviors, asking questions, being a good sport and so on they are very versatile, editable and usually visually rich following set guidelines and using appropriate text.

 

For many parents life after a diagnosis of autism can move forward significantly using social stories they can help their child feel more comfortable with skills, situations, events and behaviors their child is struggling with making family life tolerable and also life in school easier and less stressful for their child.

 

Generally all kids with autism respond well to social stories and huge success are normally reported for this excellent tool in the treatment for social skills deficits in autism.


To download and find out more about the benefits of social stories for kids with autism and how they help as a “significant” treatment for social skills deficits in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites are also good portals of social stories for kids with autism:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

Autism goals for interaction

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; which impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and causes restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication which can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Having autism spectrum disorder makes it hard for children with autism spectrum disorder to understand and relate to the world we live in, they fail to grasp social skills, which typically developing children and adults will naturally learn.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The autistic child will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in children with autism and social skills should be taught directly.


Generally children with autism are visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually. This is achievable using visual supports for autism such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help children with autism overcome social interaction difficulties.


To find appropriate autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads to this excellent autism tool:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today