Archive for the ‘what are social skills stories’ Category

Social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

Monday, October 18th, 2010

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are designed and written following a set pattern of sentence types and visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate social cues.

A social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

Generally autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Consequently, an appropriate social skills story should be visual, the vast majority of autistic individuals respond better to visual information and instruction.

Social skills stories are visual strategies using images and appropriate first person text. Each social skills story should be written from the ASD individual’s point of view.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where. when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story acts like a role model showing autistic individuals visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide ASD individual’s with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the autistic person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare the autistic person for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories are visual strategies that address communication difficulties and provide a visual framework or plan which reduces stress and anxiety as well as giving the ASD individual a chance to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations, simply because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them.

Many individuals with autism fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may have different opinions, wants and needs to them.

Consequently communication difficulties are common for an ASD individual and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing.

Social skills stories help people with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories? And how people with autism can benefit from using these visual strategies to help them address communication difficulties as well as social skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

What are social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder?

Monday, July 19th, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. Social stories were first used around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which describes a skill or situation in relevant social cues, using visual prompts and text answering the “wh” (what, where, why, when and who) as well as “HOW” questions for a particular skill, situation or behaviour.

 

For example social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder can be used for skills such as; tooth brushing, showering, visiting the dentist etc. A social skills story can be used fo teenagers to help with issues such as puberty, menstruation, making friends and so on.

 

Normally written by experts and following a set plan a social skills story can give specific information in a step by step visual plan or framework in a manner that can be easily digested and understood by children with ASD, much like a role model.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder provide ASD children, teens and adults with relevant information that can help them determine how another person may be feeling their emotions, thoughts and actions, thus showing ASD children how to react and respond in specific situations.


Social skills stories are today one of the most significant tools used to help teach social and communication skills to children with ASD. Consequently social skills stories are easily adaptable, and generally visually rich.


By addressing the theory of mind (social skills deficits) social skills stories can be used in the home, school, college and almost anywhere where the individual with autism needs help to understand and master a skill or behaviour that they are struggling to deal with.


Hopefully this will answer the ~ what are social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder question, for more information and to download social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories for ASD children or teens with autism spectrum disorder can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstoires.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

 

 

Social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills

Saturday, May 15th, 2010

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are written following a set formula to describe a situation or skill by using appropriate social cues. The social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

The social skills story should be visual as most autistic are visual thinkers and learners and will respond better to visual information and instruction.

Therefore the social skills story should give information through images and text rather than auditory or just plain written text. Each story should provide accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where, when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story is used as a means of explaining visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide the person with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories address communication difficulties effectively by providing a visual framework to help the autistic person feel more comfortable with the situation allowing them to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them, they often fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may want to do something different to what they want to do.

Consequently communication difficulties are common and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing. Social skills stories help individuals with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories and how they can help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills