Archive for the ‘ASD individual’ Category

Learning self help hygiene skills in autism

Sunday, December 19th, 2010

For people with autism learning self help hygiene skills can sometimes be problematic. This is due to deficits in social skills which is a common symptom of autism. 

 

As typically developing individuals we naturally learn hygiene routines from watching our parents, our peers and from our environment etc., this is not the case for individuals with autism and direct teaching is necessary.

 

Typically people with autism have sensory processing issues also a common symptom of autism, having autism also affects the way individuals with autism process information, think, react also act and behave.

 

A child with ASD that has developed sufficient self-help skills is more likely to be integrated into a mainstream classroom, and less likely to be teased for inappropriate behaviours.

 

Research shows us that the majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore any Intervention Strategies used for children with autism to provide information or instruction is generally better when presented visually.

 

For example Intervention Strategies which ARE visual such visual support cards, PECS, and social stories ARE USED with positive results. Probably the most popular Intervention Strategy for learning self help hygiene skills in autism is Social Stories.

 

Social stories are a tool for improving positive behaviours and skills in a child with ASD. A social skills story is a short descriptive explanation in visual format and first person text used as a visual plan or framework of a skill or behaviour that needs teaching or mastering.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation. The social skills story breaks the skill into smaller easier to understand sections and should focus on the key social cues, answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

 

Social Stories also provide the ASD individual with possible solutions and suggestions as well as showing them what others are expecting of them, as well as what the ASD individual can expect from others.

 

Learning self help hygiene skills in autism using Social Stories has proven effective. Developed twenty years ago social skills stories can be implemented to help with not only self help and hygiene skills but also other social or communication skills the ASD individual may be struggling with.

 

To find out more about social stories and how they may benefit people with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Alternatively other social stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

Monday, October 18th, 2010

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are designed and written following a set pattern of sentence types and visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate social cues.

A social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

Generally autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Consequently, an appropriate social skills story should be visual, the vast majority of autistic individuals respond better to visual information and instruction.

Social skills stories are visual strategies using images and appropriate first person text. Each social skills story should be written from the ASD individual’s point of view.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where. when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story acts like a role model showing autistic individuals visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide ASD individual’s with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the autistic person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare the autistic person for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories are visual strategies that address communication difficulties and provide a visual framework or plan which reduces stress and anxiety as well as giving the ASD individual a chance to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations, simply because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them.

Many individuals with autism fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may have different opinions, wants and needs to them.

Consequently communication difficulties are common for an ASD individual and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing.

Social skills stories help people with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories? And how people with autism can benefit from using these visual strategies to help them address communication difficulties as well as social skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social story on hygiene and Autism

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential everyday life skill.

 

However for a person with autism spectrum disorder even the simplest of hygiene tasks such as tooth brushing can cause anxiety and distress. For a person with autism spectrum disorder social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common.

 

Generally people with autism have sensory processing issues; are either hyper or hypo sensitive to stimuli – sight, sound, touch, taste or smell. Making a task such as tooth brushing problematic; the cold water, taste of the tooth paste even the nylon bristle of the tooth brush can be distressing.

 

Also a lack of social skills deficits affects how the autistic individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to sensory stimuli and those around them. So for example looking a hygiene and autism, it is not uncommon for an autistic individual to simply not understand the need for hygiene and self care.

 

Generally people with autism live in a ‘literal world’ meaning they fail to see the social rules or etiquette, they will speak literally and really not care much what others may be thinking or feeling, this is not arrogance merely a symptom of autism.

 

Generally, people with autism spectrum disorder lack social and communication skills and need direct teaching. Most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures.

 

Therefore visual strategies like social stories work very well for teaching and encouraging social skills the person with ASD is struggling to master or understand.

 

Consequently, using a social story on hygiene and Autism is beneficial. The social story will help the person with ASD understand the basic need for hygiene and how this is accomplished.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and reactions of others, helping to reduce stress and anxieties.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism can tackle teaching the need for hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist, showering, puberty and so on.

 

Using visual strategies has been shown to work; social stories use first person text and visual images much like a comic strip, as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behavior being tackled, in a manner the ASD individual will understand.

 

Social stories for autism should be editable, printable and easy to implement, need no formal training to use and easy to personalize for each ASD individual.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism will help explain visually the need for hygiene, why and how.

 

To learn more about visual strategies like social stories for autism and hygiene visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For other social stories for autism and hygiene as well as other issues visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Encouraging positive behaviour using social stories

Monday, April 19th, 2010

Social stories can be used as a tool for encouraging positive behaviours in children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Using social stories as a strategy does not need any formal training, parents, care givers, teachers, teacher’s assistants and so on can use social stories effectively as a means of encouraging positive behaviours as well as helping to improve social and communication skills.

 

Research suggests that social stories are a major proactive behaviour intervention that provides a positive approach in encouraging appropriate social behaviours.

 

A social story is a short story written in first person language from the ASD individual’s point of view.

 

We know that children with ASD tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Consequently, the social story was designed to encompass this. Developed twenty years ago as a means of communication, the social story has now evolved into a major intervention strategy in autism.

 

Studies show encouraging positive behaviour using social stories has proven very effective and their use has grown dramatically over the last twenty years.

 

Research also suggests that social stories have been proven to reduce inappropriate behaviours, for example tantrums, inappropriate vocalizations, as well as reduce social isolation.

 

Encouraging positive behaviour using social stories is also beneficial in helping children with ASD understand and learn skills such as sharing, making friends, taking turn, respecting personal space and so on.

 

Social stories are beneficial for all individuals with autism spectrum disorder, and are available from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories are user friendly, easy to implement and require no formal training to use. Using visual images and accurate no frill text a social story is much like a visual framework of the skill or behaviour that the ASD individual’s struggling to master, understand, cope with or that needs encouraging.

 

Social stories are available over the internet, written by experts that can be downloaded, printed and edited to suit all children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Improving self help hygiene skills in autism

Friday, April 16th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential life skill; people with autism may need to learn this essential life skill directly. As typically developing individuals we learn hygiene routines through watching our parents, our environment, our peers and school. For individuals with autism learning any social or behavioural skill is not done in the typical manner.

 

Due to social skills deficits people with autism do not process information in a typical manner, neither do they people watch, or absorb information from their environment. This is why direct teaching for improving self help hygiene skills in autism is proving necessary.

 

A child with ASD that has developed sufficient self-help skills is more likely to be integrated into a regular classroom setting and have better experiences with peers.

 

Research shows us that social and communication skills and behaviours are improved in individuals with autism when the necessary information is presented visually. For example information is given and absorbed far easier with visual cues such as support aids, cards, PECS, and social stories.

 

Social stories are used as a tool in improving positive behaviours and skills for individuals with autism. A simple social story is a short visual description using visual images as a framework of a skill or behaviour that needs teaching or mastering.

 

A simple social story describes the skill or behaviour through text and images much like a comic strip conversation be detailing only the important social cues, as well as answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and by providing the ASD individual with possible solutions and suggestions as well as showing them what others are expecting of them, as well as what they can expect from those around them.

 

Studies into the effectiveness of direct social skills teaching suggests that social stories are effective in teaching and improving self help hygiene skills in autism.

 

To find out more about social stories and how they may benefit any ASD individual visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Alternatively other social stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Do social stories work?

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

Social stories are short, specifically written stories to help children with autism understand a specific situation, activity or skill.

By describing what happens in a social situation in a concise, accurate and structured manner, that is easily understood by the individual with ASD.

The goal of the social story being to provide the individual with ASD a clear framework of the skill or situation, thus reducing anxieties and stresses, allowing the person with autism to rehearse and practise the skill. The social story also helps the person with autism prepare for a change to routine.

Research suggests that social stories which follow a predefined formula can make a difference in helping an individual with autism understand and improve social and communication skills and behaviours.

A social story should answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) using first person text and visual images, showing the individual with autism an acceptable manner of behaviour in a social situation, “without actually having to tell them”.

So do social stories work?

Yes they do, why? By attempting to address the theory of mind, or social skills deficits that all individuals with ASD have.

For many autistic people being able to understand the thoughts and actions of those around them is missing this is due to the theory of mind or social skills deficits. As typically developing beings we are able to “mind read” or predict another persons mood, thoughts, feelings and emotions by simply reading their facial expression, body language and tone of voice or suggestions. With the ASD individual this natural ability is missing.

A social story can help an individual with ASD understand the thoughts and emotions of the people that they may interact with.

By using visual images a social story can be better understood, as generally most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners. The social story is set out in much the same manner as a comic strip conversation, making it easier for the ASD individual to follow.

A social story should be written in first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic individual.

Research shows us that children with autism do respond well to social stories, thus many parents, care givers and teachers use social stories regularly to help improve and encourage positive social and communication skills.

To find out more about social stories and how that can hep your child with ASD visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

For other specific social stories for your child with ASD visit:
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Encourage and teach daily living skills in children with autism

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

As typically developing beings we naturally learn through our senses (sight, sound,  touch, taste and smell) as well as watching our peers and family how to interact with the world around us this is called the theory of mind

For those individuals on the autism spectrum this ability to naturally learn social and communication skills is missing, this is called and common in all individuals with autism. For individuals on the autism spectrum learning social and communication skills needs to be done directly.

Many parents and teachers of children with autism have found that by using visual supports for autism such as social stories and visual support cards, they can help encourage and teach daily living skills in children with autism.

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and will respond to information when it is presented visually rather than written text or orally, therefore parents and teachers of children with autism use visual supports for autism.

Social stories help improve social, communication, interaction and imagination skills and behaviours. Developed around twenty years ago as a method of communication the social story is one of the most significant treatments used in encouraging and teaching daily living skills in children with autism.

Social stories provide an autistic individual with accurate information about the skill or situation that they are finding difficult or confusing.

The social story describes in detail giving focus to the key points the skill or behavior, using visual images as key social cues the ASD individual can easily relate to the situation or skill. Rather like using a visual plan they can follow a step by step framework making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

The social story can be used to encourage and teach daily living skills for children with autism such as: personal hygiene, play skills, taking turns, sharing, personal space. The social story works well in school allowing the student with autism to understand school rules feel more comfortable at recess etc.

Social Stories attempt to address the theory of mind or social skills deficits that are displayed by all children with autism, by giving the ASD individual some perspective on the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors of those around them.

To learn more about social stories and how they might help your child with autism visit any of the following sites were you will find appropriate social stories for download.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

What are social stories for ASD?

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. Developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to teach communication skills to the ASD children she was working with.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which describes using visual prompts and text the “wh” (who, what, where, why and when) questions for a particular skill or behaviour.

 

For example social stories are used in situations such as; hygiene issues ~ like tooth brushing, showering etc. with teenagers to help with issues such as puberty, menstruation, making friends and social behaviour and so on.

 

By showing the social cues or prompts the social skills story can give specific information in a step by step visual plan or framework in a manner that can be easily digested and understood by the individual with ASD.

 

Social stories provide ASD children, teens and adults information which will help them determine how another person may be feeling their emotions, thoughts and actions helping the ASD individual better react and respond in specific situations.

 

Social stories are probably one of the most significant tools used to help teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Consequently social skills stories for ASD can now be easily adapted and are generally always visually rich.

 

By addressing the theory of mind (social skills deficits) presented the ASD individuals, for example social stoires can be used in the home, school, college and almost anywhere where the individual with autism needs help to understand and master a skill or behaviour that they are struggling to deal with.


Hopefully this will answer the ~ what are social skills stories for ASD question, for more information and to download social skills stories for ASD and related conditions visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories for individuals with autism spectrum disorder can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstoires.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

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