Archive for the ‘individuals on the spectrum’ Category

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Unlike typically developing children, a child on the spectrum WILL ONLY display inappropriate or odd behaviours for a reason an internal or external factor, NOT out of boredom, mischief or simply for the hell of it!

 

Generally individuals on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore, when considering techniques and strategies which can help combat autistic behaviour difficulties those techniques and methods should be VISUAL.

 

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories can have a profound effect for children on the spectrum helping overcome many of the difficulties they face daily.

 

Deficits in social, communication and imagination skills ARE a common weakness in autism, and the major reason for most autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

All individuals on the spectrum WILL certainly have deficits in social, communication and imagination skills. However the degree of deficits will depend on the autistic individual.

 

Commonly, Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties ARE implemented by parents, in schools, colleges and can be used to HELP a child on the spectrum UNDERSTAND AND COPE with a situation, event or skill that is causing them distress, confusion or fear.

 

Social Skills Stories WILL encourage positive behaviours, and reduce unwanted and negative situations and behaviours.

 

Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior  

 

A social story will act as a role model, like a visual framework detailing the key points of the skills or behaviour and showing visually what is happening.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of weakness for people with autism.

 

Generally people with autism have difficulties understanding that other people may not share their interests and may have different opinions. By using Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties YOU can help the individual with an ASD realise that people are all different with varying opinions and likes and dislikes.

 

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive pieces of first person text with visual images showing a skill in visual comic like fashion allowing the individual with an ASD to practise the skill or behaviour, helping them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

To learn more about popular Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior where you will find information on social skills stories as well as downloads of appropriate social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties

 

Other sites with social stories can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Visual schedules for autism

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Using autism tools such as visual schedules for autism is beneficial. A visual schedule is a set of pictures or images that show visually, like a step by step plan a series of activities or the specific steps of an activity. The visual schedule does this by showing the child on the spectrum what activities will occur and in what sequence.

 

To make a visual schedule you will need a set of pictures or images that can be used and a piece of laminated card or board that the images or pictures can be attached to. Appropriate pictures or images can be acquired from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Much like a social skills story, visual schedules for autism provide the child on the spectrum with positive cues allowing them to predict what is happening and what is about to happen which removes anxieties.


Using appropriate images or pictures a visual schedule gives the child with autism a step by step framework for the day. Children with autism do not like surprises and rigidly stick to routines. Visual schedules are excellent autism tools, for removing anxieties and setting routine and structure to the day.


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and will respond well to visual information. Another excellent resource recommended for use with children with autism and visual schedules is the social skills story.

 

For example many children with autism struggle with even simple tasks like asking questions, class discussions, using the toilet, hygiene, recess and so on. Anxieties can still occur even if you are using visual schedules for autism. If the child with autism is unsure how to perform a task or activity on the schedule they may become confused and anxious, this is where a social skills story will help.

 

Again visually rich a social skills story can show using a specific style and formula how the child on the spectrum should act and why. By using visual images a social skills story sets out the task, skill or activity by breaking it down into small understandable steps; the visual cues allowing the child with autism to understand the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what removing stress and confusion.

 

For many children with autism communication can be tricky, this is common to autism, social skills stories predict the reaction and suggest possible responses the child with autism may consider making.


For example: many children with autism have difficulties with activities such as visiting the dentist. Parents suggest in recent surveys using social skills stories allows their child to rehears the visit by reading through the story. Therefore once at the dentist the child with autism is not stressed they will understand what is happening and what is expected of them, they will also understand why the dentist will want to look into their mouth and what they should do, for example sitting in the chair, the lights will be bright etc.

 

Now the child is prepared using visual schedules for autism your child can see a dental visit is happening and by reading the social story your child will not be anxious about this upcoming event.


By giving your child with autism and visual schedules and social skills stories you’re using autism tools that are specifically designed to help individuals on the spectrum cope with daily activities and changes to routines successfully.

 

All individuals on the spectrum will benefit for autism tools such as visual schedules and social skills stories.

 

To download social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


To accquire images and pictures that can be used on any visual schedules or as flash or PECS cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

How to teach social skills to autistic children

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Social skills are learnt naturally through socialization, we watch people and learn through experience, our environment, peers and families.

 

The ability to learn social skills naturally is missing in autistic children and therefore they need to learn social skills directly through supports, like for example social skills stories.

 

Social skills stories show us how to teach social skills to autistic children, such as holding a conversation, understanding nick names, sharing, respecting personal space, taking turns and so on.


Social stories teach the autistic person both verbal and nonverbal communication skills and behaviours which will help them act appropriately in social situations. For example social skills stories teach social skills to individuals on the spectrum such as waving goodbye, saying hello, lining up, in school assembly, whilst out shopping and so on.

Individuals on the spectrum do not read subtle cues contained in social interactions, such as how to tell when someone wants to change the topic of conversation or shift to another activity.

By teaching the autistic person to read social cues you will provide them with the knowledge to determine how to act in various situations or why to perform certain skills such as good hygiene habits or visiting the dentist.

Consequently, many parents looking at methods on how to teach social skills to autistic children turn to autistic supports such as social stories as a means of not only teaching social skills but as a means of communicating also.

Social stories answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into verbal and nonverbal communication, plus an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

Using social stories as a strategy to teach an autistic child social and communication skills is beneficial. Research shows social stories as a strategy improves positive behaviours and reduces negative behaviours and anxiety.

To learn more about social stories as a strategy visit:

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com and learn how to teach social skills to autistic children using these autistic supports. Easy to use and with no need for any kind of training to use social stories are printable, editable and can be personalized for convenience and ease of use.

Alternativelly social stories can be found at any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Teaching self help skills to teens with autism

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

Teenagers with autism tend to miss many social cues therefore direct teaching of social skills is beneficial.

 

For typically developing teenagers learning acceptable social skills is difficult, they tend to miss subtle cues, fail to recognise changes to tone of voice, facial expression body language changes and so on. Having social skills deficits, being unable to read verbal and non verbal signals is going to hinder a teen with autism.


Having social skills deficits is common to all teenagers with autism, the degree of symptom is dependant on the individuals own degree development as no two teens with autism will ever be the same.


Treatments of autism developed to help teens on the spectrum cope with and learn acceptable social and communication skills are beneficial.

 

One of the major treatments of autism used around this time is social stories. Many teens on the spectrum will already be familiar with the uses of social stories and may have used them through school and growing up.

 

Social skills stories were first developed twenty years ago to help aid communication for children with autism. But since then their use has increased and today they are widely used for all individuals with autism to help them not only communicate but also learn social, interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. They are also used extensively for teaching self help skills to teens with autism with good effect.

 

Teaching self help skills to teens with autism such as hygiene skills, puberty, menstruation and so on, all life skills a teen on the spectrum may struggle to understand but will undoubtedly need to learn.

 

Social skills stories are normally written following a set pattern of four main sentence types: Perspective, directive, descriptive and control sentences. The social story will use first person text in a manner individuals with autism understand. A social story is generally visual; individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners making visual representation beneficial and easier to comprehend.


The social skills story acts as a role model for individuals on the spectrum showing and answering the “wh” questions who, where, when, why, and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, expressions and feelings of others all helping the autistic teen feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Teaching self help skills to teens with autism need not be an uphill struggle, using social skills stories is beneficial. To learn more about how a social skills story could benefit your autistic teen visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Social stories specifically aimed at hygiene issues can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Other ASD teen social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asd_teens


All ASD teen social stories are written by an expert in autism. Other social stories can be found at http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for children on the spectrum

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

Social stories can be used as a treatment to help improve the social and communication skills of children on the spectrum.

Generally all children with autism spectrum disorder will have social skills deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours.

It is because of these social skills deficits children on the spectrum have difficulties with social situations, for example making friends, sharing, taking turns play skills and so on.

Social stories were first used as a means of communication, developed around twenty years ago by a therapist that at the time was working with autistic children. Since then social stories have grown in popularity and uses and are now regularly used to teach and improve the social and communication skills of those individuals on the spectrum.

Today social stories are probably one of the major tools used to help individuals on the spectrum learn social and communication skills and behaviours and can be easily adapted to suit their differing needs. There are many sites on the internet offering downloads of social stories for children on the spectrum, one such site is http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A social story is a short descriptive story, like a comic strip with visual images that details a situation or skill in small bite sized pieces, that can be easily understood and followed, by an autistic individual.

The social story follows a specific formula and is normally written in first person language and from the point of view of the autistic individual. With no frill language and visual images the social story breaks the situation or skill down in to relevant social cues, answering the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what).

Allowing individuals on the spectrum the opportunity to see what others are expecting of them, how they may be feeling, their emotions,  and give them an idea of what others may be expecting from them.

Social stories for children on the spectrum are used for various situations and skills that the child may be struggling with, like recess, hygiene skills, eating habits etc.

Many parents and teachers use social stories with great results, research suggests children with autism spectrum disorder do respond very well to social stories.

To find out how you can use social stories for children on the spectrum visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will be able to find more information and downloads of social stories.

Encourage and teach daily living skills in children with autism

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

As typically developing beings we naturally learn through our senses (sight, sound,  touch, taste and smell) as well as watching our peers and family how to interact with the world around us this is called the theory of mind

For those individuals on the autism spectrum this ability to naturally learn social and communication skills is missing, this is called and common in all individuals with autism. For individuals on the autism spectrum learning social and communication skills needs to be done directly.

Many parents and teachers of children with autism have found that by using visual supports for autism such as social stories and visual support cards, they can help encourage and teach daily living skills in children with autism.

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and will respond to information when it is presented visually rather than written text or orally, therefore parents and teachers of children with autism use visual supports for autism.

Social stories help improve social, communication, interaction and imagination skills and behaviours. Developed around twenty years ago as a method of communication the social story is one of the most significant treatments used in encouraging and teaching daily living skills in children with autism.

Social stories provide an autistic individual with accurate information about the skill or situation that they are finding difficult or confusing.

The social story describes in detail giving focus to the key points the skill or behavior, using visual images as key social cues the ASD individual can easily relate to the situation or skill. Rather like using a visual plan they can follow a step by step framework making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

The social story can be used to encourage and teach daily living skills for children with autism such as: personal hygiene, play skills, taking turns, sharing, personal space. The social story works well in school allowing the student with autism to understand school rules feel more comfortable at recess etc.

Social Stories attempt to address the theory of mind or social skills deficits that are displayed by all children with autism, by giving the ASD individual some perspective on the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors of those around them.

To learn more about social stories and how they might help your child with autism visit any of the following sites were you will find appropriate social stories for download.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

“Everyday”, “normal” hygiene routines for the majority of us come naturally. As typically developing individuals we have been programmed to watch, listen and learn from those around us and this is how we pick up on our hygiene routines.

 

For individuals on the spectrum this ability to watch, listen and learn is missing, autistic individuals are less likely to learn everyday, normal hygiene routines from watching others and in most cases will need direct teaching of these skills.

 

This can be done through the use of visual supports for autism and related conditions, we know autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, thus using visual supports for autism makes good sense. An individuals on the spectrum are far more likely to understand and follow a visual prompt than a written prompt or oral.

 

There are many visual support aids for autism available but probably the most significant of these are social skills stories. These were introduced around twenty years ago specifically for children with autism and related conditions, to help them communicate and understand skills and behaviours that they were struggling to master.

 

Deficits in social and communication skills are common to autism and using social skills stories has been proven affective. Many parents, teachers and other professionals use visual support aids for autism to help them teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours, for example hygiene routines like, brushing teeth, washing hair, getting a hair cut and so on.

 

Used correctly social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism are effective. You may download social stories from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Social stories are short, visual descriptive plans of a skill or behaviour, much like a comic strip. Social stories break the skill down into small visual steps, describing and showing the “wh” questions (who, where, what, when and why). Helping the individual with ASD understand what is expected of them, and in return what they can expect from others.

 

Making the individual with ASD feel more comfortable with and in the situation, which in turn can eliminate much of the stress and confusion they may be feeling.

 

Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism can be achieved. To download hygiene social stories for autism visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene for all other social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Remember hygiene social stories for autism can be immediately downloaded and implemented today to help overcome hygiene issues in children with autism, as well as teens.]

 

 

 

 PR: wait…  I: wait…  L: wait…  LD: wait…  I: wait… wait…  Rank: wait…  Traffic: wait…  Price: wait…  C: wait…

Autism Spectrum Disorder Social Skills Stories

Friday, February 26th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago as a method for teaching and communicating with individuals on the spectrum.

They were developed to aid communication in both verbal and nonverbal autistics. The goal being that individuals on the spectrum were able to use the autism spectrum disorder social skills stories as a tool to help them clarify and understand information and directions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills stories provide the child with ASD explanations and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing.

Used effectively as a tool to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder the  social story uses visual cues to show the child with ASD what is expected of them as well as what they can expect from others.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social skills impairments which make social and communication skills difficult to master.

ASD social stories therefore help to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder, visually almost like a comic strip script, the skill or behavior in terms of relative social cues and prompts making it easier for the child with ASD to understand the “wh” question (who, where, When, what and why)

Research shows us that teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder is made easier when visual aids are used.

Consequently, parents with autistic children and teachers use visual tools such as social skills stories for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder. The social skills story is visually rich and is used much like a step by step visual plan detailing the skill being mastered.

Showing the child with ASD visually possible outcomes, giving focus to the key points, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

The social skills story can also be used to help with routine changes, teaching skills and behaviors, explaining rules and so on…

ASD social stories use a specifically defined style and format. They are mainly written by experts in autism.

Many parents with autistic children, teachers as well as other professionals use social skills stories for autistic children to teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills stories for autistic children on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autimsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 PR: wait…  I: wait…  L: wait…  LD: wait…  I: wait… wait…  Rank: wait…  Traffic: wait…  Price: wait…  C: wait…