Archive for the ‘visual supports’ Category

How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic deficits

What are Autistic Deficits?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Autism Visual Supports

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Commonly the vast majority of children with autism WILL struggle with the everyday tasks and skills that a typically developing individual will have NO PROBLEMS with, like for example making friends, asking questions appropriately, joining in play and so on.

It’s mainly due to the individuals social skills deficits which ARE common to ALL with Autism Spectrum Disorder and in many cases sensory processing issues that many children with autism have difficulties with otherwise “normal” skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that using autism visual supports CAN be beneficial. Autism visual supports are designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face daily.

Recent autism treatment research suggests that autism visual supports like visual support cards, social stories, PECS communication boards and visual schedules all HAVE a large part to play in the treatment and development of social and communication skills for many autistic kids.

Parents CAN NOW find sites offering autism visual supports which ARE run by parents and professionals that offer support and other autistic resources.

Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing and through Directories.

The World CAN be a very confusing place to a child on the spectrum,   many of the everyday skills we take for granted  a child with autism CAN FIND difficult and stressful.

Typically many families with an autistic child can find even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.

Help, is what most families with an autistic child need as well as trusted supports that have been proven to work.  

Help such as social stories ARE beneficial. What are social stories?

Probably the most significant autism visual supports ARE social stories. A social story is much like a role model or visual plan used to describe a skill or situation in terms of relevant social cues and prompts.

Today social stories are EASY TO IMPLEMENT need no formal training to use and can be edited to suit all terminology and autistic kids no matter where on the spectrum scale they fall.

As one of the major autistic resources used to help teach, support and HELP individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits social skills stories ARE available to download TODAY from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A social skills story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping the autistic child get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.

So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social skills story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social skills story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.

Sites which offer IMMEDIATE ACCESS to autism visual supports like social stories and visual support cards for a minimal fee like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families and individuals with autism.

Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic impairments.

What are Autistic Impairments?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Autistic visual supports

Sunday, August 8th, 2010

Visual supports are used to help people with autism spectrum disorder. Visual supports should be easy to implement, adaptable and portable, making them convenient and easy to use.


Research suggests that the vast majority of people with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they can process information easier when it is visual rather than written text or auditory.


Consequently, presenting visual information can help children with autism learn vital everyday living skills and behaviours, including communication skills.

 

Autistic visual supports are useful when teaching children with autism social, communication and imagination skills, as well as helping with transitions, changes to routines and sensory processing issues.

 

Research suggests autistic visual supports such as social skills stories are beneficial and can be adapted to suit all abilities and ages. Social skills stories follow specific patterns. Originally designed twenty years ago as a communication aid, this autistic support has since grown into a major tool in autism today.

 

Social skills stories answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which helps to reduce stress and anxiety.


Used as a tool in autism for teaching and supporting social and communication skills, social stories are used like a framework or role model explaining and visually showing the skills, situation or behaviour that the autistic individual is struggling to cope with or master.


Editable, printable, needing no formal training to use they can be personalized and adapted to suit any autistic individual. To learn more about social stories and how they are used and implemented to help children with autism learn suitable behaviours and skills visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find important information on social stories their uses and how they benefit children with autism spectrum disorder. There is also support and downloads of appropriate social stories which can be printed for convenience and ease of use. Other sites offering autistic visual supports such as social skills stories can be found at: 

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Autistic visual supports what are they?

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Visual supports are part of our everyday lives, we read newspapers, books, use the internet, watch TV, look at road maps, signs and so on. They are important, the vast majority of us rely on visual supports in our jobs, at school, college and so on, and many of us could not function as effectively without visual supports.

Visual supports can be used to help people with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions in much the same way.

Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore presenting information in a visual manner can help encourage and support the communication skills, language development, social skills development, encourage positive behaviours and the ability to process information in people with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition which affects a person’s ability in three main areas of development: social interactions, communication – verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills. This is often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments.

The triad of autistic impairments is found in all autistic individuals, but to varying degrees dependant on the individuals own level of development. There is no cure for autism, but there are various methods and treatments for autism available which can help people with autism spectrum address the triad of autistic impairments.

Having a lack of social interaction, communication and imagination skills can be confusing and lead to social isolation and even bullying in many cases. For children with autism it is vital that they are taught appropriate social, communication and imagination skills directly. This is achieved using treatments for autism like autistic visual supports.

So autistic visual supports what are they and where can you find them? There are various treatments for autism like social stories, PECS, flash cards, schedules, communication boards and so on all very good autistic visual supports and all readily available for most parents of autistic children.

The internet is the perfect place to begin looking for supports for children with autism, sites run by behaviour specialists, O.T.,  Language specialists, clinics and so on offer parents of autistic children the chance to order and download various autistic visual supports sometimes for free or for a small fee.

Probable one of the major visual supports for children with autism is social skills stories. A good source of social skills stories is found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are used to teach and encourage social interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours as well as address other difficulties that the person on the autism spectrum may be struggling with such as personal hygiene issues, school related difficulties and so on.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Using visual images and first person text the social skills story breaks the skill down into relevant social key points giving the person on the autism spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill making it more predictable, therefore reducing anxieties, confusion and stress.

 

Social skills stories are easy to edit; personalize and print making them convenient and easy to use. To find out more about autistic visuals supports what are they visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Children with Autism need social skills

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder of the brain which affects the way a person interacts and communicates with others.

 

Interestingly, almost four times more boys than girls are diagnosed with autism. Children are generally diagnosed with autism by three years of age.

 

The term “Autistic Spectrum Disorders” encompasses the many varying degrees of autism, from low functioning autism where the child will almost certainly have other difficulties such as seizures and in most cases educational deficits also. On the other end of the “Autistic Spectrum Disorders” scale – Asperger’s syndrome or high functioning autism, where the child will almost certainly be of average or above average intelligence.

 

It would be very wrong of us to categorise all children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorders into the same category. As with typically developing children all children with autism develop at varying degrees and no two children will ever be exactly the same.

 

However that said, all children on the spectrum will have social skills deficits. These are common to autism, social skills deficits affect the way children on the spectrum develop socially, as well as their communication skills and imagination skills.

 

Having social skills deficits can mean your child with ASD may be unable to communicate effectively, they may find making friends difficult and become stressed in social settings.

 

For many parents their child’s inability to relate or interact with other people can be stressful. Coupled with their child’s communication difficulties and odd use of language can leave many parents frustrated and needing help to teach their child appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Children with Autism need social skills teaching directly, it is of no use to simply explain what your child should be doing, this will not help. Typically children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, meaning spoken or written information is not going to be understood as easily as information given visually.

 

So what does this mean for the child with ASD, well put simply talk less and use more visual supports when trying to teach an ASD child social and communication skills.


Children with Autism need social skills as much as everyone else does to help them function. A good source of visual supports are social stories, these treatments of autism have been around for around twenty years and are today probably the most significant treatments of autism used when finding means to teach an ASD child social and communication skills.

 

Social stories are short descriptive stories much like a comic script with visual images showing a skill or behaviour in a manner that is easily understood by children on the spectrum.

 

The social skills story breaks down the skill, such as respecting personal space, washing your teeth, taking a bath, eating dinner even visiting the dentist into small chunks, removes the frills and shows with visual images and first person direct text.


Explaining the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what, as well as giving an insight into emotions, thoughts and feelings of those others involved, and suggest possible outcomes.

 

As well as detailing what to expect from others and in return what they expect in return from the child, all helping to make the child with ASD more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories work as well as get access to downloads of social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Where you will find stories for hygiene issues, play, family matters as well as some stories for the classroom and out and about.

 

Alternatively visit sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

 

Visual supports used for autism

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

Visual supports can be used to help children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder), visual support tools for autism should be adaptable, portable and easy to implement for most situations.

 

For the majority of us visual prompts are an everyday part of our lives, for example we read newspapers, the internet, T.V. guide, a recipe, road signs, maps and shopping lists. Our visual prompts provide us with information and knowledge, without visual prompts we would not function as well.

 

We know from experience and extensive research that most autistic individuals are visual learners and thinkers.


Therefore presenting information in a visual manner will help us to teach and encourage the skills and behaviours those children with ASD struggle with like: communication difficulties, social interactions, imaginative play, making friends and so on.


By learning appropriate social and communication skills YOU can help your autistic child reach his/her full potential, promote independence, build confidence and raise self-esteem.

 

Consequently, many parents, care givers and teacher think visual supports used for autism in the home, classroom and college such as social skills stories help promote and teach those vital everyday and less common social and communication skills we as typically developing beings learn naturally.

 

Visual supports used for autism such as social skills stories present information visually through images and short pieces of appropriate text, almost like a comic script. A social story is used a s a role model or visual plan of the skill, situation, behaviour or communication difficulties and will help guide and explain the autistic child what he/she can expect.


The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and emotions of others. Social skills stories are implemented easily and need no formal training to use, learn more about social skills stories by visiting http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will gain immediate access to 100 social skills stories as well as find support.

 

Other sites that offer social skills stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Motivating a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder is not going to be easy. By definition a child with autism will almost certainly have a restricted repertoire of interests and skills as well as difficulties with social interactions, imagination and communication skills.

Many parents will struggle to teach social and communication skills to their child. But without planned, positive experiences, and resources that are designed to help teach appropriate skills and behaviors many children with ASD often become victimized by their autism as they age.

Strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder should include visual supports such as social skills stories, PECS and  flash cards.

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images or pictures, which makes understanding oral or written instruction or information difficult for them.

Therefore motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder is better achieved when visual supports are implemented. Many strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder are now available from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Parents do not need any formal training to use social skills stories or flash cards, these visual strategies are easy to implement and used successfully both in the home and classroom.

Social skills stories are probably one of the major tools used to help teach and motivate children with autism spectrum disorder. Since their development twenty years ago social stories have grown in popularity and are now readily used by parents, teachers and professionals caring for special needs kids with autism and related conditions.

Developed by therapist Carol Gray social stories are short visual strategies that detail skills and situations the child with autism is struggling to master or understand. Using visual images and first person text the social story acts as a role model or visual plan answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into how others are thinking and feeling.

 

To learn more about how a social story could help your child visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find detailed information on social stories and how they can be used to teach and motivate children with autism.

 

Other sites of interest include:

 

Flash cards can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

Visual supports for children with autism

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers; which means they think in pictures. Therefore, the most successful ways to help children with autism learn and understand the information they are given is through visual supports and aids.

 

Many teachers and parents of children with ASD report negative behaviours and frustrations felt and displayed by children with autism when information is difficult to understand, such as written or oral instruction etc, rather than visual.

 

For many children with autism spoken words are not easy to comprehend, much like listening to a foreign language, which can be frustrating and stressful this can lead to meltdowns and the child generally just “switching off”

 

Consequently, it has been found that when attempting to teach or convey information to a child with ASD, using visual supports for children with autism is beneficial. Avoiding long spoken sentences or pieces of text with no illustration is advisable for most children with ASD.

 

Visual supports for children with autism are generally used to help support oral commands and information, for example visual support cards can be used to help show a child with autism the toilet, coat peg, library and so on..

 

The most significant visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual support cards or (PECS) as well as other support aids such as social stories.

 

By using visual support cards it allows the child with ASD to focus on the message being taught or the information being presented.

 

In the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to help the student with ASD organize their day for example on a visual timetable. The student with ASD will like repetition and sameness, a visual timetable can help achieve this, the student can easily identify what lesson is coming up next, what they need to do, where they need to be etc.


Also in the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to show direction and information. For example many teachers of students with autism place visual support aids on the pencil draw, the bathroom, sink and so on to help the student with ASD identify easily where things are, this can save a lot of confusion and stress not only for the teacher but also the student themselves.

 

In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual supports aids around the home again on a visual timetable, helping the child identify mealtimes, bath time, time for school and so on.


In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual aids to help the child identify certain areas, things, objects etc, for example the toilet, sink, where the cups are stored and so on.

 

Visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder are also used to help the child with ASD learn social and communication skills, for example brushing your teeth, hair and so on. Used as a strategy visual supports can be used with social stories affectively to teach skills, communication and behaviours. Many parents of ASD children find used as a strategy visual supports and social stories are beneficial and both are recommended to help all children with ASD learn appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.


To learn more and see examples of visual supports for children with ASD and related conditions visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Social stories that help can be instantly downloaded from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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