Archive for the ‘ASD children’ Category

Writing Social Stories for children with autism

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

What are social stories?

 

Social stories are short descriptive stories which explain a skill or situation in terms of relative social cues, perspectives and common responses in a defined manner, using pictures or images and first person text, much like a comic script.

 

The goal of a Social Story is to present accurate information in a consistent and reassuring manner that children with autism can easily understand.

 

Social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago to help with communication difficulties in children with an ASD. Today, Social Stories are not only ideal for children with an ASD but are also a positive approach for adolescents and young people with autism and related communication disorders.

 

For children with an ASD communication both verbal and non verbal is an area of marked weakness, this is mainly due to social skills deficits which are common to all individuals with autism.

 

What are social skills deficits?

 

Social skills deficits are sometimes referred to as the triad of autistic impairments:

Social skills deficits

Communication deficits

Imagination deficits

 

These deficits are always present in individuals with autism to varying degrees, as with typically developing children no two ASD children are ever the same and development will vary.

 

Social Stories are used to focus on a specific skill or situation the child on the spectrum is struggling with for example: changes to routines, for most ASD children any changes to routines no matter how small can be a real problem, using a social story to explain the upcoming change can help reassure and prevent anxiety and stress.

 

Writing social stories for children with autism is an effective way of dealing with issues. A social story should contain Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and control sentences always be from the child’s point of view and in first person text.

 

Children on the spectrum tend to be visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, this concept is used in most social stories. The social story should map out the skill or situation using images and text. Answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, this is an area of weakness to individuals with autism.

 

A social story is like a role model or visual framework showing the social cues.  Social stories need no formal training to use and are editable, no two children are the same and we all use different terminology, therefore generally most social stories will need slight tweaks to make the content relevant to your child.

 

To learn more about implementing social stories and get downloads of social stories which have been already written for you to save you time visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will also gather information on writing social stories for children with autism as well as info on what are social stories and why do they help?

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Using printable social stories for autism

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Using printable social stories for autism as a visual plan or framework is a powerful tool for teaching children on the autism spectrum. Social skills stories are visual representation of situations, social skills, behaviours or events that happen in our lives.

 

Children with autism struggle with social, communication and imagination skills; this is often referred to as social skills deficits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism spectrum disorder, but will vary in degree depending on the ability of the ASD child.

 

However social skills deficits are always present, therefore strategies are needed to help teach ASD children methods of overcoming these deficits in social skills.

 

By using printable social stories for autism you can help teach an ASD child a particular social, communication or imagination skill or behaviour that they may find problematic or confusing.

 

For example many children on the autism spectrum struggle with hygiene skills, sharing, taking turns and making friends, using visual strategies like social stories can help much like a role model,  using visual images, pictures and text like a comic strip.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that take a concrete approach to learning which will help ASD children to understand what is being said, how they should react and how to recognize situations that occur that they may be struggling with.

 

By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. Social skills stories should follow a specific formula of sentence types, be editable and easy to personalize as no two children are ever the same and we all use different vocabulary.

 

To find out more about using printable social stories for autism on issues such as hygiene visit:

http://www.autismsocialsories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Social stories for ASD

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Social stories can be used effectively as visual strategies for helping individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Developed around twenty years ago to help communication difficulties in ASD children, social stories are now a major autistic resource used to teach and encourage social and communication skills in ASD children and adults

The social skills story follows a set formula of four sentence types. 

Social stories for ASD are used in situations and skills the ASD individual finds difficult to cope with, they can be edited and adapted easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the ASD individual.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on.

Teachers can use social stories for ASD in the classroom, on the playground, out and about and for other tasks like personal hygiene etc

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are “visual thinkers and learners” meaning they think in images and pictures, therefore they are more able to absorb information and instruction when the information is visual rather than written text or auditory.

Social stories are visual strategies which describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses.

The social skills story is used to help with communication difficulties, changes to routines, explain rules and show how other people may be feeling by explaining another’s point of view. The social skills story will also show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social stories for ASD for your child with ASD can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social stories for autism

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Common to all individuals with autism are deficits in social skills. Teaching social skills to children with autism can quite often become a primary focus at school and in the home. Many parents and teachers report success in teaching social skills to children with autism can lead to an increase in the child’s self confidence.

Generally children with autism are visual learners, meaning they think in pictures and will gain more benefit from visual information rather than written, auditory or oral information.

Therefore visual strategies are believed to work best with ASD children. Social stories are used as visual strategies. A social skills story is used to show a child with autism how to perform or understand a certain skill or situation.

A social skills story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction and break it down into smaller easier to understand sections. The social skills story provides details and information that the child with autism can understand this is important because children with an ASD often find social situations confusing.

Social stories for autism answer the “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as give the child with autism an insight into the thoughts feelings and psooible reactions they may expect from others.

The main goal of any social skills story should be to provide ASD children with a role model, a visual plan and framework which will help reduce anxieties and stress for the child with autism.

While social stories for autism are normally implemented to address a particular skill or situation, ASD children can also use social skills stories for autism to deal with other deficits in social skills such as hygiene issues, social awkwardness and communication difficulties.

Common to all individuals with autism is awkwardness with social interactions, such as respecting personal space, having conversations, asking questions etc. Social stories can be used to help deal with these issues.

Social stories should provide information about the feelings of others and the consequences of ignoring those feelings.

Normally written in first person text and using visual images social stories should be written from the child’s point of view with appropriate language. No two children with autism will ever be the same therefore when using social stories you will normally need to tweak or edit the social skills story to personalize it for your own child. We all use different terminology and adding your own personal terminology will help with the effectiveness of the story.

To learn more about implementing social stories and how you can download professional social skills stories today visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

What is it like to be autistic?

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

There are very few physical signs of autism spectrum disorder. So what is it like to be autistic? Imagine being left in a foreign country alone, unable to speak the language, unable to read the signs or gestures of others. Your senses have become super sensitive, and you have nowhere to turn to for help.


This is how the world appears for many autistic children. Our ever changing and fast moving world can trigger anxiety attacks, confusion and stress for those with autism spectrum disorder.


Parents of autistic children report anxieties. Although autism is being diagnosed more frequently with 1:4 being diagnosed autistic, still there is not a lot of information on autism. Parents of autistic children report difficulties such as having to get used to people thinking you are a bad parent that cannot control their child. Parents of kids with autism also report problems from doctors calling them an over-anxious parent, family members dismissing their child as a spoilt brat. Parents of kids with autism also find difficulties with friends, being shunned and not included in events because of their autistic child’s behaviours.


Having a child diagnosed autistic is not going to be easy, experts agree early intervention is beneficial.

 

Parents of kids with autism also agree that visual supports are a good idea, such as visual support cards, schedules, social stories and PECS communication systems.


All designed to help children with autism cope in an ever changing and confusing world. Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in images or pictures and will gain more help from visual strategies rather than spoken or text.

 

Implementing visual strategies can benefit children with autism greatly. For example many children with an ASD struggle with simple tasks such as tooth brushing, introducing social stories can help with this.


Social stories are short specific visual strategies, pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skills in terms of the relevant social cues. Using first person language with no frills, following a specific pattern social stories are visual strategies that are used to teach and re-enforce social and communication skills as well as give clear coping strategies for sensory processing issues and behaviour difficulties.


Much like a visual plan or role model a social skills story can answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of those around them.


So for example a social skills story for tooth brushing can teach children with an ASD why it is important to brush your teeth, how to brush your teeth and what the consequence of not brushing your teeth might be.


Teachers and parents with ASD children do not need any formal training to use social skills stories, they can be printed, personalized and edited to make them easy to implement and convenient.

 

ASD children respond well to visual strategies such as social skills stories, visual support cards, schedules and PECS.


For more information on visual supports such as social stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or for more information on visual support cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

What are social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder?

Monday, July 19th, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. Social stories were first used around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which describes a skill or situation in relevant social cues, using visual prompts and text answering the “wh” (what, where, why, when and who) as well as “HOW” questions for a particular skill, situation or behaviour.

 

For example social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder can be used for skills such as; tooth brushing, showering, visiting the dentist etc. A social skills story can be used fo teenagers to help with issues such as puberty, menstruation, making friends and so on.

 

Normally written by experts and following a set plan a social skills story can give specific information in a step by step visual plan or framework in a manner that can be easily digested and understood by children with ASD, much like a role model.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder provide ASD children, teens and adults with relevant information that can help them determine how another person may be feeling their emotions, thoughts and actions, thus showing ASD children how to react and respond in specific situations.


Social skills stories are today one of the most significant tools used to help teach social and communication skills to children with ASD. Consequently social skills stories are easily adaptable, and generally visually rich.


By addressing the theory of mind (social skills deficits) social skills stories can be used in the home, school, college and almost anywhere where the individual with autism needs help to understand and master a skill or behaviour that they are struggling to deal with.


Hopefully this will answer the ~ what are social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder question, for more information and to download social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories for ASD children or teens with autism spectrum disorder can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstoires.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

 

 

ASD – Autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

With an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with ASD, it is now recognized that autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than disorders such as diabetes, spina bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children diagnosed with ASD will have common symptoms of autism; these are known as social skills deficits or the triad of impairments.  A child’s social skills deficits are characterized by difficulties in:


Social skills development

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills


These deficits are always present in children with ASD to varying degrees.


In addition to the triad of impairments or social skills deficits children diagnosed with ASD may also display sensory processing issues.


Probably the most noticeable of the symptoms of autism is an individual’s difficulty with social interactions. A child with autism spectrum disorder may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.


Typically a child with autism spectrum disorder will not follow the normal pattern of development. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before their child is diagnosed with ASD.

 

For example from birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case.

 

Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication both verbal and non-verbal can prove difficult for ASD children.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder will never develop speech, or speech may be delayed. Generally all individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and benefit form visual aids that can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder using visual aids that teach social and communication skills such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories are proving very beneficial.


For the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct. For example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autism spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Consequently, many children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching is achievable by using visual aids like social stories. Since their development twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used for teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills in children with autism and related conditions today.

 

Social stories are a role model that provide individuals with ASD a visual explanation in the form of a script, much like a step by step visual representation or plan of the skill or situation that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with an ASD.


Giving the individual with ASD accurate information that answers the “wh” questions
(who, where, why, when and what)
as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior.

 

Social stories will help reduce anxieties and stress making them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

What are social stories for ASD?

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. Developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to teach communication skills to the ASD children she was working with.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which describes using visual prompts and text the “wh” (who, what, where, why and when) questions for a particular skill or behaviour.

 

For example social stories are used in situations such as; hygiene issues ~ like tooth brushing, showering etc. with teenagers to help with issues such as puberty, menstruation, making friends and social behaviour and so on.

 

By showing the social cues or prompts the social skills story can give specific information in a step by step visual plan or framework in a manner that can be easily digested and understood by the individual with ASD.

 

Social stories provide ASD children, teens and adults information which will help them determine how another person may be feeling their emotions, thoughts and actions helping the ASD individual better react and respond in specific situations.

 

Social stories are probably one of the most significant tools used to help teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Consequently social skills stories for ASD can now be easily adapted and are generally always visually rich.

 

By addressing the theory of mind (social skills deficits) presented the ASD individuals, for example social stoires can be used in the home, school, college and almost anywhere where the individual with autism needs help to understand and master a skill or behaviour that they are struggling to deal with.


Hopefully this will answer the ~ what are social skills stories for ASD question, for more information and to download social skills stories for ASD and related conditions visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories for individuals with autism spectrum disorder can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstoires.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

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Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

Â

In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com