Teaching a child with ASD play skills

Kids with autism find play skills and social interaction with peers extremely difficult. 

 

This is due to their social skills deficits, which are common to all individuals with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), the degree of social skills deficits will depend on each individual, no two children will ever be the same.

 

A child on the autism range will undoubtedly have social skills deficits in three main areas of development, social interactions, communication both verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills.

 

Because of the child’s rigidity of thought and behaviour, and limited imagination or imaginative play skills, the child on the autism range may carry out ritualistic actions. For example lining up their Lego or sorting it into colours rather than playing with it.

 

A child on the autism range may focus upon minor details, for example rather than play with the toy car they may be obsessed with the wheel only and continuously spin it, rather than play with the whole car.

 

Plus with limited verbal and non-verbal communication skills the child with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will lack the ability to converse naturally and may misunderstand the emotions, gestures, or ideas of others, and have difficulties understanding wit, humour and pretend play talk.

 

Kids with autism tend to be very literal, making pretend or imaginative play difficult for them to join in with or understand.

 

However there are techniques available that help build and promote play skills in children with autism.

 

One such technique is the use of social skills stories these can be adapted to suit individual’s needs, can be printed and used almost everywhere making them ideal in the home, school and out and about.

 

Consequently teaching a child with ASD play skills can be initiated using social skills stories as a means of showing the child with ASD how and why we play. By answering the “wh” questions: who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. The social skills story acts like a role model or visual plan when teaching a child with ASD play skills by detailing the skill and breaking it down into small pieces.

 

Using visual images and first person text the social skills story can help the child with ASD better understand the skill or behaviour, therefore making them more comfortable with and in the situation, reducing stress and un-necessary anxiety.

 

To find appropriate social skills stories that help teach play skills as well as other social and communication skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic deficits

What are Autistic Deficits?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Social stories can help children with autism learn social skills

Social stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text that use images to help show the child with ASD how to develop social understanding and interact with others which is difficult for most autistics.

Social stories are written to help children with autism learn social skills and behaviours which they struggle with like for example – making friends, asking questions, sharing and so on…

Following set patterns of sentence types the social story is typically written in first person text and always from the perspective of the child with ASD.

The social story should aim to answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also aim to offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistics.

 Social stories can help children with autism learn social skills by giving them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour.

Characteristically kids with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they tend to think and learn visually rather than through written or spoken means. It is therefore important when trying to teach or impart information to kids with ASD you should make it visual, social stories follow this idea.

Using images to describe much like a visual plan or step by step plan the visual social story is easy to implement and will need no formal training to use.

To download social stories which can help children with autism learn social skills visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

Access Autistic Visual Supports

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Teach social skills to kids with autism

Children with autism have a variety of deficits which ARE common to autism. However the main deficits associated with the disorder are often referred to social skills deficits.

Characteristically social skills deficits affect three main areas of development: social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

 Unlike typically developing kids a child with ASD WILL NOT learn social skills through observation, peers, family and the environment and WILL NEED direct teaching to overcome social skills deficits.

There ARE numerous supports for autism which can be used to teach social skills to kids with autism such as social stories, picture communication cards, flash cards and so on..

These supports for autism ARE commonly referred to Visual Intervention Strategies and by large ARE used to support and teach social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours amongst other uses such as help with hygiene skills, puberty, activities and events the child with ASD may find confusing or stressful.

Many parents and teachers ARE able to teach social skills to kids with autism using Visual Intervention Strategies as they need NO FORMAL training to use and implement and are readily available online from experts like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A social skills story is a short descriptive almost comic like in appearance story which shows a child with ASD what is happening and why. This WILL help to reduce unwanted stress, anxiety and confusion, which in turn WILL HELP the child with ASD feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

The social skills story WILL ANSWER the “wh” question – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and WILL ALSO offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

Characteristically children with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners, which makes social skills stories ideal. The social story should focus on one particular skill or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with and visually show and explain how and what is required of them and in return what they can expect from others.

A social skills story USES visual images/pictures a long with first person text and will always be written from the point of view of the child on the spectrum.

Children with autism fins social interactions difficult, the social skills story can act like a visual framework or plan which the child on the spectrum can follow and refer to in times of difficulty.

Social skills stories ARE USED in many situations for example: asking questions, joining in play, making friends, recess, getting a haircut, visiting a dentist, going to a birthday party and so on…

Teach social skills to kids with autism using social skills stories by visiting sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autistic Visual Supports

Individuals with autism ARE typically “Visual Thinkers – Visual Learners”, this means that they think in pictures and images and use speech / words as a secondary language.

“I think in pictures. Words are like a second language to me…when somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures… One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills.” (Grandin, 1995).

Therefore presenting information and guidance visually will have a much better impact on individuals with autism.  There are a number of visual supports for autism which WILL help your child on the spectrum learn skills and behaviours that they find confusing, stressful or simply do not understand.

Autistic Visual Supports like: Social Skills Stories, Communication Picture Cards (flash cards), PECS and so on CAN be quickly and easily implemented and need NO formal training to use.

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive visual representations of a skill or behaviour. The social story breaks the skill down into smaller components, removes and un-necessary fluff or language and explains How and why something happens.

The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, what, where, why and when and provides an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.


Autistic Visual Supports – Communication Picture Cards (flash cards)
ARE small laminated cards depicting an image or skill. For eample the Communication Picture Cards can be USED as an exchange –  the child with ASD hands over a picture card in retuen for the item on the card  -for example an apple at snack time and so on.

The Communication Picture Cards are also USED on visual timetables, as pointers around the home or in school, on chices boards, now and next boards and as a communication tool.

Both Social Skills Stories and Communication Picture Cards ARE available from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

To learn more about Autistic Visual Supports and how they can benefit your child with ASD visit today and download Social Skills Stories which can be adapted to suit individual needs, no two children are the smane and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore it is important that the social story you choose is editable.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Behaviour management for kids with autism

It is important to remember it is more useful to put strategies in place to help prevent inappropriate behaviours before they happen than to try and deal with the behaviour once it has occurred.

It is also important to remember that ALL behaviour displayed by kids with autism is for a reason an internal or external factor NEVER just because as with typically developing children.

Due to the triad of autistic impairments children with autism have a lack of social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that because of the triad of autistic impairments that any behaviour management for kids with autism is devised to help the child with ASD understand and cope with skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand and manage.

Help such as visual intervention strategies, which ARE used to help teach social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

There are many different positive behaviour supports like visual intervention strategies such as: Social Skills Stories, Visual Social Story Cards, Flash Cards, PECS and so on…

Using Positive behaviour supports for ASD is beneficial.

For example positive behaviour supports for ASD can teach self-help skills, choice and decision making, routine changes, social awareness, communication skills and environmental changes as well as much more.

Probably one of the major strategies used is social skills stories – these are short descriptive pieces of text which can be used to help the child with ASD feel more comfortable with and in a situation.

Social Skills Stories use visual images to help explain a situation, skill, behaviour or event from the child’s own perspective. Typically kids with ASD are visual thinkers and learners; this means that they understand visual information easier than that which is written or spoken.

Noticeably kids with ASD have communication difficulties and find reading facial expressions and body language confusing, this is also due to their social impairments.

Having social impairments can make friendships difficult to build and maintain again positive behaviour supports for ASD can help alleviate this issue and help the child with autism develop friendships.

The social story will help answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistics.

The social story can act like a visual framework or plan of the skill being taught, it will focus on the key points or cues and suggest possible outcomes for the child with autism to follow.

To learn more about behaviour management for kids with autism and how social skills stories WILL help visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic impairments.

What are Autistic Impairments?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com