Strategies to teach children with autism

A child with an ASD will not intentionally cause stress or upset anybodies feelings. A child with an ASD will not misbehave or harm simply out of fun or mischief.


Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.


The common characteristics of autism will often make a child with autism appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.


These are not bad characteristics, just difficult to understand. However for parents with autistic children these common characteristics of autism can make life extremely difficult and at times stressful.


Strategies to teach children with autism social and communication skills and behaviours are useful, research does suggest parents report significant improvements in social behaviours.


Having the ability to socially interact and communicate both verbally and nonverbally is a naturally learnt ability in typically developing beings. These skills however are missing in autistic children and need to be taught directly.


Using strategies to teach children with autism such as social stories does show vast improvements in social and communication skills. Social stories are short descriptive stories like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.


Using visual images which most autistic people find easier to understand and first person text the social story breaks the skill down into relevant social cues and shows the individual with autism spectrum disorder what to expect and what others will expect from them.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how using strategies to teach children with autism like social stories will help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories with pictures

Social Stories with pictures are excellent visual strategies that help children with autism spectrum disorder learn social and communication skills and behaviours, a social story can show a child with autism what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.


Social stories with pictures can help a child with autism overcome their fears or complete tasks which they need help understanding.


Social skills stories were developed originally as an aid to communication with autistic children. Social stories are now more widely used as visual strategies, an autistic resource and support, to help encourage and teach social, communication, imagination and sensory processing issues and behaviours.

 

A social story is a short visual story that has been written in a specific style and format.  It describes what happens in a specific social situation and presents information in a structured and consistent manner, by answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the feelings and thoughts of others.

 

Social stories with pictures or images and first person text are an excellen autistic resource giving clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation, without un-necessary fluff.

 

The goal of a social story is to attempt to address the “theory of mind” or social skills deficits by giving individuals some perspective on the thoughts, emotions and behaviours of others.

 

The theory of mind or social skills deficits is common to all individuals with autism spectrum disorder. For individuals with autism spectrum disorder having social skills deficits can hinder their social development. Having social skills deficits affect how an individual processes information, thinks, act, reacts, communicates, interacts and behaves.


Using social skills stories can address many of the issues faced by children with autism spectrum disorder on a daily basis and long term, the social story can help with changes to routines, transitions and communication difficulties.


Generally children with autism spectrum disorder have communication difficulties and may act oddly in social situations, not because they want to draw attention to themselves but because they may not understand that others can have different opinions to them, or that other people may want to do something different to what they want to do.


This can make social situations unpredictable and confusing to the child on the autism spectrum. Social stories therefore help the child on the autism spectrum understand what is happening and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.


Most children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, therefore by implementing social stories with pictures for social, communication and imagination skills that need teaching is beneficial and can act as an appropriate role model to the autistic child.


To find out more about how social stories can help an autistic child learn social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Alternative sites offering appropriate social stories with pictures can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

Probably one of the major roles a parent plays in their child’s development is teaching their child social skills. For example daily living skills like potty training, interaction skills like sharing, taking turns, and allowing others to talk without interrupting.

 

Typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally by people watching, observing how those around them do things and handle social situations. We don’t really stop to consider how easily our typically developing children can master suitable age appropriate social and communication skills.


However this is not the case for a child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

 

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

 

For a child with an ASD learning social and communication skills naturally is not easy, due to social skills deficits common to all individuals with autism.

 

Individuals with autism do not people watch and fail to recognise some nonverbal communication such as gestures and signs, for example waving goodbye, a thumb’s up or shhhhhh etc.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder need direct teaching of social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Consequently, parents are encouraged to help their autistic youngster learn appropriate social skills. Having social skills deficits may mean your child fails to recognise subtle cues, maybe unable to read body language or facial expression and misunderstand language such as wit, humour, jokes and slang etc…


So; social skills deficits how can you help your autistic child overcome them, many parents use visual supports for autism. This is mainly because children with autism spectrum disorder are normally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and images, which makes using visual supports for autism beneficial.

 

Therefore using visual supports for autism is going to help you teach your autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills. There are various visual supports for autism available, but probably the best know and most affective are social skills stories.


A social skills story is a visual framework that is effective in teaching children with autism social and communication skills. A social skills story breaks the skills or situation down into relevant key points giving explanations of the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into nonverbal communication such as the thoughts, feelings and emotions that may be felt by others.


By using visual images and first person text a social story allows the child on the spectrum to visually identify with the skill or situation making it predictable and routine. Individuals with autism prefer to stick rigidly to routines and can become stressed if routines are altered or changed, social skills stories are ideal for this, they can prepare the autistic child for upcoming changes.


Social skills stories follow specific patterns of sentence types, are editable and printable making them convenient and easy to use. The social skills story can be used to teach most social and communication skills. For example potty training, using a toilet, washing your hands, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, not interrupting, asking questions, making friends, even social situations like visiting the dentist etc..


By breaking the skill or situation down in to understandable pieces, removing all fluff and irrelevant material etc the social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan allowing the child on the spectrum to feel more in control and comfortable. Removing all fear or dread of the unknown, the social story makes the skills or situation predictable just how a child on the spectrum likes things to be.


To learn more about social skills stories and how they are used to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Where you will learn more about…what are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them as well as getting downloads of social skills stories used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism.


Having autism and finding friends

Many children with autism spectrum disorder do want to make and have friends. But having autism spectrum disorder can make this difficult.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects a persons development in three main areas: social interactions, communication difficulties and imagination skills.

 

These developmental difficulties are referred to as the autism triad of impairments and it is this which hinders children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The autism triad of impairments will vary from child to child as no two children will ever be the same.

 

Some children with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may have little or no language and may have other related disabilities.

 

By contrast for children on the other end of the autism scale, with for example asperger syndrome will often be schooled in mainstream schools and be of average to above average intelligence. It is generally this end of the autism scale, those with asperger syndrome and high functioning autism whom probably desire friendships.

 

For this set of children with asperger syndrome, high functioning autism or mild autism making and maintaining friendships will be a struggle. A staggering fact is that unfortunately it is believed that around 40% of autistic children in mainstream education will at some point be a victim to bullying.

 

A typically developing child in mainstream education will eagerly await recess and break times to let off steam and play with their friends, it is their time to run around and socially interact with their peers and have fun.

 

However for an autistic child, often the sound of the bell can fill them with fear and dread. Autistic children prefer structure, routine and dislike surprises, noises and the unstructured chaos of free time. They find choice making difficult will quite often become overwhelmed by recess and break times.

 

For many autistic children recess is a confusing part of the school day. There are a lot of choices to be made, what to play with, who to play with, what to do, so many choices a normal child will take for granted and enjoy, this is not the case for an autistic child.

 

For example a simple playground game that a typically developing child may enjoy, can be confusing to an autistic child. The autistic child may choose to join in with their peers, but may be unable to follow the rules of the game. For typically developing children this can be frustrating needing to stop and reconfirm the rules constantly. The child on the spectrum will not be deliberately being awkward, they probably do not understand the need for rules, and then just as they start to understand this set of rules, the rules may change, or the game may stop.

 

However, for some children with autism that do understand the rules this may also prove a problem, as they may stick rigidly to the rules which in some cases can take the fun out of the game for the other normally developing children. The typically developing children may simply loose interest and unfortunately the child on the spectrum may not understand why this is and become distressed.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder are hypo or hypersensitive and can become overwhelmed by noise, which can make recess or break time a painful and stressful time. They may be seen pacing up and down in their own little world until recess is over and they can return to the routine and structure of the classroom.

 

All these factors can make autism and finding friends difficult to say the very least.

 

So how can you help with the problem of autism and finding friends?

 

Generally as discussed earlier kids with autism prefer structure and routine, this can be achieved by the use of autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories, these resources are used in the classroom to add structure and routine the child’s day.

 

These autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism cope with recess and break times taking away some of anxieties they may feel around this time of the day.

 

The autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism understand how to maintain friendships, by teaching the autistic child how to use conversation, how to pretend play, how to be kind, respect peoples feelings and personal space, how to share and make choices and so on, all social skills we take for granted, but an autistic child will need to be taught these social skills directly.

 

Therefore the perfect place to start with autism and making friends is with autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories to teach the autistic child the social skills necessary for making and maintaining friendships and dealing with recess and break times.

 

You can find appropriate social skills stories and other autism resources for kids with autism for download at:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Autistic visual supports what are they?

Visual supports are part of our everyday lives, we read newspapers, books, use the internet, watch TV, look at road maps, signs and so on. They are important, the vast majority of us rely on visual supports in our jobs, at school, college and so on, and many of us could not function as effectively without visual supports.

Visual supports can be used to help people with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions in much the same way.

Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore presenting information in a visual manner can help encourage and support the communication skills, language development, social skills development, encourage positive behaviours and the ability to process information in people with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition which affects a person’s ability in three main areas of development: social interactions, communication – verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills. This is often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments.

The triad of autistic impairments is found in all autistic individuals, but to varying degrees dependant on the individuals own level of development. There is no cure for autism, but there are various methods and treatments for autism available which can help people with autism spectrum address the triad of autistic impairments.

Having a lack of social interaction, communication and imagination skills can be confusing and lead to social isolation and even bullying in many cases. For children with autism it is vital that they are taught appropriate social, communication and imagination skills directly. This is achieved using treatments for autism like autistic visual supports.

So autistic visual supports what are they and where can you find them? There are various treatments for autism like social stories, PECS, flash cards, schedules, communication boards and so on all very good autistic visual supports and all readily available for most parents of autistic children.

The internet is the perfect place to begin looking for supports for children with autism, sites run by behaviour specialists, O.T.,  Language specialists, clinics and so on offer parents of autistic children the chance to order and download various autistic visual supports sometimes for free or for a small fee.

Probable one of the major visual supports for children with autism is social skills stories. A good source of social skills stories is found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are used to teach and encourage social interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours as well as address other difficulties that the person on the autism spectrum may be struggling with such as personal hygiene issues, school related difficulties and so on.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Using visual images and first person text the social skills story breaks the skill down into relevant social key points giving the person on the autism spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill making it more predictable, therefore reducing anxieties, confusion and stress.

 

Social skills stories are easy to edit; personalize and print making them convenient and easy to use. To find out more about autistic visuals supports what are they visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Teaching self help skills to teens with autism

Teenagers with autism tend to miss many social cues therefore direct teaching of social skills is beneficial.

 

For typically developing teenagers learning acceptable social skills is difficult, they tend to miss subtle cues, fail to recognise changes to tone of voice, facial expression body language changes and so on. Having social skills deficits, being unable to read verbal and non verbal signals is going to hinder a teen with autism.


Having social skills deficits is common to all teenagers with autism, the degree of symptom is dependant on the individuals own degree development as no two teens with autism will ever be the same.


Treatments of autism developed to help teens on the spectrum cope with and learn acceptable social and communication skills are beneficial.

 

One of the major treatments of autism used around this time is social stories. Many teens on the spectrum will already be familiar with the uses of social stories and may have used them through school and growing up.

 

Social skills stories were first developed twenty years ago to help aid communication for children with autism. But since then their use has increased and today they are widely used for all individuals with autism to help them not only communicate but also learn social, interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. They are also used extensively for teaching self help skills to teens with autism with good effect.

 

Teaching self help skills to teens with autism such as hygiene skills, puberty, menstruation and so on, all life skills a teen on the spectrum may struggle to understand but will undoubtedly need to learn.

 

Social skills stories are normally written following a set pattern of four main sentence types: Perspective, directive, descriptive and control sentences. The social story will use first person text in a manner individuals with autism understand. A social story is generally visual; individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners making visual representation beneficial and easier to comprehend.


The social skills story acts as a role model for individuals on the spectrum showing and answering the “wh” questions who, where, when, why, and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, expressions and feelings of others all helping the autistic teen feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Teaching self help skills to teens with autism need not be an uphill struggle, using social skills stories is beneficial. To learn more about how a social skills story could benefit your autistic teen visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Social stories specifically aimed at hygiene issues can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Other ASD teen social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asd_teens


All ASD teen social stories are written by an expert in autism. Other social stories can be found at http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism

Children with autism do not develop socially in the same manner as typically developing children. ASD (Autism spectrum disorder) is a neurological disorder affecting the way an individual’s brain develops

 

Children with an ASD have difficulty making friends and getting on well with their peers.

 

A child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is far more likely to enjoy unusual interests not shared by their peers, for example an obsession with train timetables, clock mechanisms etc. This can in some cases cause the child to become socially isolated and unable to integrate fully with their peers.

 

All children with autism will have social skills deficits. However the individual’s social skills deficits will vary between children with an ASD, as no two children will ever be exactly the same.

 

Having social skills deficits can make it hard for children with autism to understand how other children are feeling, their emotions, they will be unable to read the other child’s body language or facial expression.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism can be difficult. However with time and perseverance, as well as autism supports like social skills stories this can be achieved.

 

What are social skills stories?

 

A social story is a short story that has been written in a specific style and format. A social story gives information through visual images and text, providing clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.


The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what. Showing visually what people do and why they do it, like a role model for the child with an ASD. This can help relieve anxieties and stress that can surround some social situations, for example making friends, asking questions, sharing, taking turns even respecting personal space, in-fact most social and communications difficulties can be addressed using social skills stories.


In fact the social skills story acts as a prompt for socially acceptable behaviours and can help the child with autism understand situations and skills and show them appropriate responses.

 

The social skills story can help the child with autism prepare for routine changes and new situations, which can help reduce negative reactions and behaviours which stem from a lack of social understanding.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism using social skills stories has already proven successful, today social stories are considered one of the major autism supports and are widely used in homes, schools, colleges and out and about.

 

To learn more about autism supports such as social skills stories visit sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills where you will also find a vast selection of social skills stories which can be downloaded.


Other sites of interest are:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Children with Autism need social skills

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder of the brain which affects the way a person interacts and communicates with others.

 

Interestingly, almost four times more boys than girls are diagnosed with autism. Children are generally diagnosed with autism by three years of age.

 

The term “Autistic Spectrum Disorders” encompasses the many varying degrees of autism, from low functioning autism where the child will almost certainly have other difficulties such as seizures and in most cases educational deficits also. On the other end of the “Autistic Spectrum Disorders” scale – Asperger’s syndrome or high functioning autism, where the child will almost certainly be of average or above average intelligence.

 

It would be very wrong of us to categorise all children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorders into the same category. As with typically developing children all children with autism develop at varying degrees and no two children will ever be exactly the same.

 

However that said, all children on the spectrum will have social skills deficits. These are common to autism, social skills deficits affect the way children on the spectrum develop socially, as well as their communication skills and imagination skills.

 

Having social skills deficits can mean your child with ASD may be unable to communicate effectively, they may find making friends difficult and become stressed in social settings.

 

For many parents their child’s inability to relate or interact with other people can be stressful. Coupled with their child’s communication difficulties and odd use of language can leave many parents frustrated and needing help to teach their child appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Children with Autism need social skills teaching directly, it is of no use to simply explain what your child should be doing, this will not help. Typically children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, meaning spoken or written information is not going to be understood as easily as information given visually.

 

So what does this mean for the child with ASD, well put simply talk less and use more visual supports when trying to teach an ASD child social and communication skills.


Children with Autism need social skills as much as everyone else does to help them function. A good source of visual supports are social stories, these treatments of autism have been around for around twenty years and are today probably the most significant treatments of autism used when finding means to teach an ASD child social and communication skills.

 

Social stories are short descriptive stories much like a comic script with visual images showing a skill or behaviour in a manner that is easily understood by children on the spectrum.

 

The social skills story breaks down the skill, such as respecting personal space, washing your teeth, taking a bath, eating dinner even visiting the dentist into small chunks, removes the frills and shows with visual images and first person direct text.


Explaining the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what, as well as giving an insight into emotions, thoughts and feelings of those others involved, and suggest possible outcomes.

 

As well as detailing what to expect from others and in return what they expect in return from the child, all helping to make the child with ASD more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories work as well as get access to downloads of social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Where you will find stories for hygiene issues, play, family matters as well as some stories for the classroom and out and about.

 

Alternatively visit sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

 

Visual supports used for autism

Visual supports can be used to help children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder), visual support tools for autism should be adaptable, portable and easy to implement for most situations.

 

For the majority of us visual prompts are an everyday part of our lives, for example we read newspapers, the internet, T.V. guide, a recipe, road signs, maps and shopping lists. Our visual prompts provide us with information and knowledge, without visual prompts we would not function as well.

 

We know from experience and extensive research that most autistic individuals are visual learners and thinkers.


Therefore presenting information in a visual manner will help us to teach and encourage the skills and behaviours those children with ASD struggle with like: communication difficulties, social interactions, imaginative play, making friends and so on.


By learning appropriate social and communication skills YOU can help your autistic child reach his/her full potential, promote independence, build confidence and raise self-esteem.

 

Consequently, many parents, care givers and teacher think visual supports used for autism in the home, classroom and college such as social skills stories help promote and teach those vital everyday and less common social and communication skills we as typically developing beings learn naturally.

 

Visual supports used for autism such as social skills stories present information visually through images and short pieces of appropriate text, almost like a comic script. A social story is used a s a role model or visual plan of the skill, situation, behaviour or communication difficulties and will help guide and explain the autistic child what he/she can expect.


The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and emotions of others. Social skills stories are implemented easily and need no formal training to use, learn more about social skills stories by visiting http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will gain immediate access to 100 social skills stories as well as find support.

 

Other sites that offer social skills stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Types of social stories for autism

Social stories were originally developed twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help with the communication difficulties she encountered while working with autistic children.


Today social stories are used more widely to develop and teach social and communication skills as well as encourage positive behaviours.

 

There are various types of social stories for autism ranging from stories to help with personal issues in teenagers to potty training stories for toddlers.


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and respond better to visual information, rather than written text or information given orally. Research suggests it is because of this social stories work so well.

Social stories present information visually through images and small amounts of appropriate first person text, almost like a comic script. The autistic child is able to follow and use, much like a visual plan, or role model of the skill or situation that they maybe struggling with.

 

Unlike a typically developing child that will learn social and communication skills naturally an autistic child will struggle to understand or pick up on social cues, such as body language and facial expressions. This lack of social and communication skills can often lead to social mistakes and blunders.

 

However using autistic child as a means of teaching social and communication skills to children with autism is a proven technique. Various types of social stories can be used at any one time for example a child may need help in the classroom to ask questions as well as at recess, P.E. lessons and assembly all these situations are dealt with using social stories.

 

At home the child may need help with personal issues like using the toilet, eating with the family and so on again various types of social stories for autism are used.

 

Social stories are normally written by experts in autism and will generally follow a set formula of four different sentence types: perspective, directive, control and descriptive sentences.

 

A social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, what and why) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social skills story may suggest possible outcomes and give positive encouragement to the child with autism.

 

Not all social skills stories will be perfect straight away and may need tweaking to suit individuals, no two people will ever be the same.

 

Social skills stories should be colourful, editable and printable to make them easy to use and convenient. To find out more about the various types of social stories for autism and to get downloads of various social skills stories for autistic children visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

Autism and Social Skills Teaching

For many parents having a child diagnosed autistic can be a real shock. Having a child diagnosed autistic is more common than you probably thought with 1 in every 150 babies born being diagnosed autistic.


Having a child with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) is not going to be easy. Generally children with autism will display social skills deficits, their autism symptoms. Some children with Low functioning autism may have other developmental issues such as little or no speech, seizures and educational difficulties.

 

With autism symptoms such as high functioning autism and asperger syndrome a child will have average or above intelligence, however their speech may still develop slowly but will develop.


A common thread that is shown in all children with ASD is their social skills deficits.


Having social skills deficits will mean your child will have deficits in

Social interaction skills

Communication skills both verbal and non-verbal

And Imagination skills

 

For some parents coping with their child’s social skills deficits can be very stressful, finding appropriate resources and help to address these issues can also be confusing and difficult.


There are treatments for autism, which help address social skills deficits effectively. Strategies and treatments for autism such as social skills stories help parents, care givers and teachers cope with and address social skills deficits.


Children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, which means that they find information and instruction easier to understand if it is presented visually rather than by text or spoken.

 

Therefore social skills stories which are used as visual role models can be easily implemented and used with good effect. There is no formal training needed to use social skills stories, they can be personalized, printed and used to teach or re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviors.


For many parents of children with ASD a major area of concern is their child’s difficulties with social development, for example parents of children with ASD worry their child will struggle to make and maintain friendships and generally “fit in”.

 

For a child with ASD social, communication, imagination and interaction skills, are not learnt naturally, these skills need to be taught directly. Consequently, autism and social skills teaching using visual supports like social skills stories is beneficial.

 

Research shows us visual supports for autism and teaching social skills using social skills stories as a strategy has grown over the last twenty years into one of the major treatments for autism used today.

 

Autism social skills stories are short, descriptive visually rich pieces of text which follow a set formula, using appropriate language autism social skills stories are used affectively as a tool for teaching and re-enforcing important social skills and behaviors to those individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Giving key focus to the vital points the social cues autism social skills stories are much like a comic strip, showing a detailed visual step by step plan of the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

For immediate download of autism and social skills teaching stories that will help you teach and re-enforce social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to your youngster visit one of the following sites where you will find autism social skills stories and visual support cards for children and young people with ASD written by experts in autism ready to be downloaded and used:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

Help to overcome social and communication difficulties in autistic child

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is one of the biggest childhood disorders. As awareness of the condition increases, researchers are seeing an increase in the number of children receiving an early diagnosis of autism.

 

What is Autism?

 

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a lifelong disability that affects the way a person communicates and relates to the people around them. An autistic child will have difficulties developing friendships and will have communication difficulties, a limited understanding of language and an inability to relate to others, or read facial and body language.


Some autistic children may have accompanying learning disabilities. All children with autism spectrum disorder have impairments in social interactions, communication and imagination. This is known as the triad of impairments, or social skills deficits.

 

Signs of what is autism?

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder will almost certainly exhibit a range of behaviours. Probably the most prominent behaviours shown will be a difficulty relating to others and making friends; communication difficulties, some autistic children may never develop speech; and an inability to engage in imaginative play.

 

Other signs of autism include obsessions, fears, a lack of awareness of danger, ritualistic play and behaviours for example spinning or lining up objects, twirling and hand flapping, inappropriate eye contact, hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity.

 

It is important to remember that a child displaying these behaviours may not be autistic.

 

Many parents look for help to overcome social and communication difficulties in autistic child.

 

Research into ASD concludes the majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners. Consequently, resources that can help address a child’s social skills deficits or the triad of impairments are normally visual tools.

 

Therefore, help to overcome social and communication difficulties in autistic child concludes using visual tools such as social skills stories, PECS, flash cards and other visual resources are beneficial.

 

Social skills stories are short visual stories, used to detail a skill or situation the child with ASD is struggling to master, for example making friends, imaginative play, sharing, asking questions, taking turns etc.


Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are used as a role model, or visual plan of the skill or situation, using visual images and short pieces of first person text to describe the skill or situation in a manner the child with ASD will understand.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and how they can be used to help overcome social and communication difficulties in your autistic child and get immediate download of social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder

Motivating a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder is not going to be easy. By definition a child with autism will almost certainly have a restricted repertoire of interests and skills as well as difficulties with social interactions, imagination and communication skills.

Many parents will struggle to teach social and communication skills to their child. But without planned, positive experiences, and resources that are designed to help teach appropriate skills and behaviors many children with ASD often become victimized by their autism as they age.

Strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder should include visual supports such as social skills stories, PECS and  flash cards.

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images or pictures, which makes understanding oral or written instruction or information difficult for them.

Therefore motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder is better achieved when visual supports are implemented. Many strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder are now available from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Parents do not need any formal training to use social skills stories or flash cards, these visual strategies are easy to implement and used successfully both in the home and classroom.

Social skills stories are probably one of the major tools used to help teach and motivate children with autism spectrum disorder. Since their development twenty years ago social stories have grown in popularity and are now readily used by parents, teachers and professionals caring for special needs kids with autism and related conditions.

Developed by therapist Carol Gray social stories are short visual strategies that detail skills and situations the child with autism is struggling to master or understand. Using visual images and first person text the social story acts as a role model or visual plan answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into how others are thinking and feeling.

 

To learn more about how a social story could help your child visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find detailed information on social stories and how they can be used to teach and motivate children with autism.

 

Other sites of interest include:

 

Flash cards can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

Strategies used for motivating students with autism

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. The disorder is characterized by a set of symptoms known as the triad of impairments, these are:

 

Social interactions skills deficits

Communication skills deficits

Imagination skills deficits.

 

This triad of impairments or social skills deficits as they are more commonly referred to are common to all individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Therefore students with autism will almost certainly display social skills deficits.

The autistic student will have social skills impairments which can affect their ability to communicate with and understand others.

 

The autistic student will lack social interaction and flexibility skills, preferring set patterns and routines, this inability to be flexible can cause stress and anxiety if routines are changed even slightly.


These social skills deficits can make understanding communication and social skills in the classroom and around school difficult for the ASD student.


It is true to say that individuals with ASD cannot easily behave in a typical “more normal” way. An autistic student will not purposefully disrupt the class; all autistic behaviour happens for a reason an external or internal (illness) factor.


It is these external and internal factors that trigger a negative autistic behaviour through sheer frustration with situations and with other people.


Teaching the ASD student is difficult. Strategies can be put in place that can help deal with the affects of the student’s social skills deficits, which can help the motivation and behaviours displayed by the ASD student.

Strategies used for motivating students with autism can include visual schedules, PECS, flash cards, autism symbols and social skills stories.


For the majority of students with autism a combination of all these autism resources is favourable. However for many students with autism probably one of the most useful autism resources available is social skills stories.


Social stories as strategies used for motivating students with autism are short visual strategies used to show a skill or situation that the student is struggling with. Using visual images and first person text the social story is used like a role model of the skill or situation. Detailing the skill by giving the student with autism the relevant social cues, answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and giving an insight into the emotions, thoughts and nonverbal communication shown or felt by others.


Easy to implement, personalize and with no formal training needed to use social skills stories are used widely in the classroom for dealing with issues such as staying on task, calling out, asking question, recess, P.E. lessons and so on.

 

To learn more about autism resources and strategies for motivation students with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

OR

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Other autism resources such as autism symbols and flash cards are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

And social skills stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Teaching daily living skills in children with autism

Research shows that children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures.


Therefore teachers and parents find that teaching daily living skills in children with autism spectrum disorder is much easier if visual supports for ASD are used.


Probable the biggest hurdle for children with autism spectrum disorder is their difficulty with social interactions, imagination and communication skills and behaviors.

 

These social skills deficit are often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments, which all individuals with ASD will have in varying degrees.

 

For the majority of children with ASD the triad of autistic impairments can make finding and making friends difficult. For a child with autism our world is confusing, we are on the whole socially orientated, so having a lack of social interaction skills can cause social mistakes and misunderstandings.

 

Consequently, parents of children with autism spectrum disorder, care gives and teaches use visual supports for ASD such as social stories to assist them in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors.


Social stories help develop social interaction skills, imagination, language and communication in children ASD. As well as encouraging daily living skills in children with autism. Social skills stories are also used to teach social skills such as hygiene, or behaviors such as making friends, personal space, visiting the dentist and so on…

 

Social skills stories are also useful in and around school. Developed twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills to children with autism, social skills stories are normally written in fist person text, following a set formula using visual images to show and explain the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

Almost like a comic strip, the visual step by step plan will show individuals with ASD the what, why, where, when and who helping them feel more comfortable in and with the situation , activity, event or skill they are struggling to master.


To download and learn more about social stories for ASD and how they are used for encouraging daily living skills in children with autism spectrum disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

For all other social stories for ASD visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

ASD – Autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

With an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with ASD, it is now recognized that autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than disorders such as diabetes, spina bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children diagnosed with ASD will have common symptoms of autism; these are known as social skills deficits or the triad of impairments.  A child’s social skills deficits are characterized by difficulties in:


Social skills development

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills


These deficits are always present in children with ASD to varying degrees.


In addition to the triad of impairments or social skills deficits children diagnosed with ASD may also display sensory processing issues.


Probably the most noticeable of the symptoms of autism is an individual’s difficulty with social interactions. A child with autism spectrum disorder may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.


Typically a child with autism spectrum disorder will not follow the normal pattern of development. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before their child is diagnosed with ASD.

 

For example from birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case.

 

Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication both verbal and non-verbal can prove difficult for ASD children.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder will never develop speech, or speech may be delayed. Generally all individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and benefit form visual aids that can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder using visual aids that teach social and communication skills such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories are proving very beneficial.


For the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct. For example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autism spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Consequently, many children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching is achievable by using visual aids like social stories. Since their development twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used for teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills in children with autism and related conditions today.

 

Social stories are a role model that provide individuals with ASD a visual explanation in the form of a script, much like a step by step visual representation or plan of the skill or situation that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with an ASD.


Giving the individual with ASD accurate information that answers the “wh” questions
(who, where, why, when and what)
as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior.

 

Social stories will help reduce anxieties and stress making them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior