Social awareness in autism

Generally most children on the autism spectrum will appear aloof even rude at times, free of pretences, oblivious to public opinion and not concerned with making a good impression. Children on the autism spectrum are honest, if you do not want a straight forward answer don’t ask, they will not pretend and will not care if they hurt your feelings by being honest.

For children with autism a lack of social skills can lead in many cases to bullying, isolation and ridicule. A child on the autism spectrum will not worry about how others perceive them or whether they are considered cool or not by their peers.

 

A lack of social awareness in autism can be aided using supports designed to help teach children on the autism spectrum why we need social skills, what they are and how to conduct themselves.

 

Most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners and will respond better to visual information, such as visual autistic supports. There are many visual autistic supports available to use, but probably the most effective visual support for autistic children are social skills stories.

 

Social awareness in autism is a problem. Social skills stories tackle the ” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others.

 

For example: You’re at a friend’s house, your friend’s son is playing nicely with his toy, but your son wants that toy. You have tried to tell him to wait, you turn your back and there is a yell! Your friend’s son is crying nursing a bitten arm, while your son is happily playing with the toy. Your son has not waited to share or asked nicely, his social awareness skills are missing, he wanted the toy therefore he took the toy.

 

What do you do? Stay in the home and never go out? NO of cause not, you teach your child on the autism spectrum appropriate social skills. Easier said than done? MAYBE! But introducing visual autistic supports such as social skills stories can really make a difference to children with autism.

 

A social skills story is aimed specifically at children on the spectrum, written by experts, needs no formal training to use, can be printed out for ease of use and convenience, will slip into your bag to take with you while out. A social story can be edited and personalized to suit your child’s ability and language recognition.

 

Social skills stories are normally visually rich using visual images to show your child with first person text how and why we do what we do or why we use certain behaviours.

 

Social skills stories are used widely by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to teach children on the spectrum appropriate social skills, they are also used to aid communication difficulties and to reduce negative behaviours such as biting, stimming, asking inappropriate questions and so on.

 

Social skills stories can also be used to help prepare for changes to routines, unexpected events or happenings, hygiene issues, in fact almost all social, communication and imagination issues can be dealt with by using social skills stories as a strategy.

 

To learn more about how to use social skills stories as a strategy when teaching social awareness in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are written following a set formula to describe a situation or skill by using appropriate social cues. The social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

The social skills story should be visual as most autistic are visual thinkers and learners and will respond better to visual information and instruction.

Therefore the social skills story should give information through images and text rather than auditory or just plain written text. Each story should provide accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where, when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story is used as a means of explaining visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide the person with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy to teach communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories address communication difficulties effectively by providing a visual framework to help the autistic person feel more comfortable with the situation allowing them to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them, they often fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may want to do something different to what they want to do.

Consequently communication difficulties are common and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing. Social skills stories help individuals with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories and how they can help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism

A major area of concern for parents with autistic children is getting to grips with their child’s social and communication difficulties. It is a fact that all children with ASD show marked developmental deficits in social and communication skills.

 

Lacking the ability to understand communication both verbal and nonverbal is difficult. It is a lack of appropriate communication skills that can lead to social mistakes, bullying and inappropriate behaviours.

 

For many children with ASD routines are important and can be a cause of stress when the routine changes even the slightest change can cause anxieties.


Many schools now recognise the need to teach students with autism expressive communication skills. But fail to help teach those students with autism to understand why we communicate and how communication can help us in our everyday lives.

 

Research suggests that children with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners. This shows us that any information or social cues we wish to share with our autistic child will be better understood when the information is presented visually.

 

Consequently using visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism spectrum disorder has proven to be an effective means of helping children with ASD address their communication difficulties.

 

Visual strategies such as visual timetables, schedules, flash cards, PECS and social skills stories are all visual tools used for increasing communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorders.

 

Visual tools such as PECS, flash cards and social skills stories are important in helping your autistic child improve positive behaviours and independence, thus helping your autistic child to reach his or her full potential.

 

Looking at social skills stories as a strategy, introduced twenty years ago social skills stories are one of the major visual tools used today for improving communication difficulties. Difficulties such as asking questions, making friends, having a conversation, sharing, taking turns, saying Hi and so on…

 

A social story is a visual plan of a skill or behaviour the child with autism is struggling with. Using visual images and age appropriate first person text the social story breaks the skill or situation into small understandable chunks.  And answers the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what), as well giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, helping the child with autism to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

To find out more about visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism by using social skills stories as a strategy visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Teaching social and communication skills to children with autism

Many parents of children with autism experience communication problems with their autistic child.

 

And trust in autism visual supports such as social skills stories as a strategy for teaching and re-enforcing social skills and behaviors. Many parents of children with autism, care givers and autistic educators use social skills stories and report tremendous successes.

 

In recent studies it was shown that these simple yet effective autism visual supports are used widely, as a tool for HELPING parents of children with autism and autistic educators deal with behavior, communication and social issues their autistic child or student is finding hard to understand or cope with.


Used as autistic visual supports for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism social skills stories can be downloaded and implemented quickly and easily from various sources such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com and are used effectively to teach social skills and behaviors.


The fact is kids with autism are often overwhelmed by noises, sensations, and activities that the rest of us consider “everyday” or “normal” which can lead to communication and autistic behavior difficulties.  Which can then in turn lead to tantrums and on occasion’s violent outbursts. They dislike surprises, and respond well to repetition.

 

This is where many parents of children with autism find social skills stories can be very beneficial to help with teaching social and communication skills to children with autism such as personal space, temper tantrums, violent outbursts, healthy hygiene habits, how to ask questions, how to make friends and many other issues, events, activities and situations are dealt with through the use of social skills stories.

 

Social skills stories are simple, understandable, first-person stories with visual aids that can help to calm and address even the most severe behaviors. Social skills stories work because they put an end to the stress, worry, and anxiety both you and your child with autism feel whenever a routine changes, a new skill needs mastering, or something changes, even something small. They help YOU teach YOUR child with autism vital coping strategies for social skills both everyday and less common.

 

To download and learn more about social skills stories for autistic children and how they are used for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or any of the following sites for expertly written social skills stories for autistic children


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources