Archive for the ‘student with autism’ Category

Social stories for ASD

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Social stories can be used effectively as visual strategies for helping individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Developed around twenty years ago to help communication difficulties in ASD children, social stories are now a major autistic resource used to teach and encourage social and communication skills in ASD children and adults

The social skills story follows a set formula of four sentence types. 

Social stories for ASD are used in situations and skills the ASD individual finds difficult to cope with, they can be edited and adapted easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the ASD individual.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on.

Teachers can use social stories for ASD in the classroom, on the playground, out and about and for other tasks like personal hygiene etc

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are “visual thinkers and learners” meaning they think in images and pictures, therefore they are more able to absorb information and instruction when the information is visual rather than written text or auditory.

Social stories are visual strategies which describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses.

The social skills story is used to help with communication difficulties, changes to routines, explain rules and show how other people may be feeling by explaining another’s point of view. The social skills story will also show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social stories for ASD for your child with ASD can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social skills stories for students with autism

Monday, October 4th, 2010

A social skills story is an intervention strategy used to teach social skills to individuals with autism.

 

Social skills stories were developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray, originally as a means of communication with the autistic students she was working with. Since then social skills stories have grown in popularity and use.

 

Today social skills stories are probably one of the most significant autism tools used to help individuals with autism cope and learn appropriate social, communication and behaviour skills.

 

Unlike typically developing children autistic kids do not develop social and communication skills in the typical manner, they prefer routines and need structure, finding changes difficult, stressful and confusing.

 

Generally autistic kids ARE visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures. Therefore the best learning method for the vast majority of students with autism is visual.

 

Using visual strategies like social skills stories is a popular answer with many teachers of students with autism.

 

A social skills story provides concrete information to help improve students’ social skills and appropriate behaviours. Normally social stories will follow a set pattern or formula of specific sentence type.

 

No two autistic students will ever be the same therefore social stories need to be editable to suit the needs and terminology used by individual autistic students.

 

A social skills story is an easy and effective way to teach students with autism how to negotiate changes to routines, handle problem situations and surprises. The social skills story will also help with situations such as transition, recess, making friends, asking questions, eating habits and personal hygiene.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism should be written from the autistic student’s point of view and use visual images to depict the situation or skill the student with ASD is struggling with.

 

Social stories should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social story should break the skill or situation down into small easier to understand sections, the important social cues and use no frill or extra language to complicate or detract from the skill or situation being dealt with in the social story.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism are visual strategies and should be printable for ease of use and convenience.

 

This visual strategy should also be easy to personalize and act as a role model or visual framework for the student with ASD.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories can help your ASD student visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Where you will find social skills stories for students with autism in key stage one, key stage two and also for preschool autism.

 

All these social stories are printable, editable and can be personalized for any student with ASD.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Social stories are used as a strategy for helping individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Therapist Gray developed the social skills story around twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills to children with ASD. The social skills story follows a defined specific formula that has been time tested and proven to work affectively.

Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions are used to help with most situations and skills and can be adapted and implemented easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the child with ASD.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on…

Teachers can use social skills stories for ASD to help within the classroom, helping the student with autism stay on track during lessons.

Generally individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual thinkers and learners meaning the will absorb information and instruction easier when that information is presented visually rather than written text or auditory.

A social story should describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses using a specific formula.

The social story is used to help with communication, routines, explain rules, show how other people may be feeling explain other’s point of view, show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social skills stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 PR: wait…  I: wait…  L: wait…  LD: wait…  I: wait… wait…  Rank: wait…  Traffic: wait…  Price: wait…  C: wait…

Visual supports for children with autism

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers; which means they think in pictures. Therefore, the most successful ways to help children with autism learn and understand the information they are given is through visual supports and aids.

 

Many teachers and parents of children with ASD report negative behaviours and frustrations felt and displayed by children with autism when information is difficult to understand, such as written or oral instruction etc, rather than visual.

 

For many children with autism spoken words are not easy to comprehend, much like listening to a foreign language, which can be frustrating and stressful this can lead to meltdowns and the child generally just “switching off”

 

Consequently, it has been found that when attempting to teach or convey information to a child with ASD, using visual supports for children with autism is beneficial. Avoiding long spoken sentences or pieces of text with no illustration is advisable for most children with ASD.

 

Visual supports for children with autism are generally used to help support oral commands and information, for example visual support cards can be used to help show a child with autism the toilet, coat peg, library and so on..

 

The most significant visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual support cards or (PECS) as well as other support aids such as social stories.

 

By using visual support cards it allows the child with ASD to focus on the message being taught or the information being presented.

 

In the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to help the student with ASD organize their day for example on a visual timetable. The student with ASD will like repetition and sameness, a visual timetable can help achieve this, the student can easily identify what lesson is coming up next, what they need to do, where they need to be etc.


Also in the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to show direction and information. For example many teachers of students with autism place visual support aids on the pencil draw, the bathroom, sink and so on to help the student with ASD identify easily where things are, this can save a lot of confusion and stress not only for the teacher but also the student themselves.

 

In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual supports aids around the home again on a visual timetable, helping the child identify mealtimes, bath time, time for school and so on.


In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual aids to help the child identify certain areas, things, objects etc, for example the toilet, sink, where the cups are stored and so on.

 

Visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder are also used to help the child with ASD learn social and communication skills, for example brushing your teeth, hair and so on. Used as a strategy visual supports can be used with social stories affectively to teach skills, communication and behaviours. Many parents of ASD children find used as a strategy visual supports and social stories are beneficial and both are recommended to help all children with ASD learn appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.


To learn more and see examples of visual supports for children with ASD and related conditions visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Social stories that help can be instantly downloaded from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 PR: wait…  I: wait…  L: wait…  LD: wait…  I: wait… wait…  Rank: wait…  Traffic: wait…  Price: wait…  C: wait…

Using social stories in a classroom

Saturday, January 23rd, 2010

Autistic students have deficits in social cognition, which means they lack the ability to think about appropriate behaviors in social settings.

 

This is explained using the theory of mind or the ability to mind read. Typically developing children can understand and read facial expression and body language. With the autistic student this ability to read other people is missing, experts believe the autistic students deficits in social cognition are due to this theory of mind.

 

Teachers use something called social skills stories to help autistic students cope with their deficits in social cognition. The social skills story gives the autistic student and insight into the skill or behavior that they are struggling with.

 

By showing them visually much like a comic strip, a step by step visual plan giving them social cues and prompts where needed and suggesting possible behaviors, which can help alleviate stresses and confusions.

 

Therefore using social stories in the classroom helps the autistic student by presenting them accurate information social cues for the skill or behavior, also showing them what they may expect from others.

 

Teachers report using social stories in a classroom for situations like for example, shared reading, waiting your turn to speak, asking questions, turn taking, interaction lessons such as gym, as well as social stories for difficulties the autistic student may have with skills such as using the bathroom, recess and so on..

 

The teacher may use social stories in a classroom in various ways, sometimes teachers may use many social stories in and around the classroom and school helping the student with autism with various skills and behaviors that they may be struggling with.


For autistic students that may be non-verbal the autistic educator will want to read the story to the autistic student at the appropriate times.

 

Generally an autistic educator will want to use social stories in a classroom to help with deficits in social cognition helping the student with autism feel more comfortable at school and in the classroom, which will cut down on melt downs and stress.

 

It is believed using social stories in a classroom is beneficial and will help teach vital social skills to the student with autism making for a happier student and class.


You may download social skills stories for autistic students from:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Other social skills stories for autistic students can be downloaded from www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Other visual supports such as visual aids cards are available from:

www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

How do visual aids help special ed children

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Students with special needs such as autism spectrum disorder often struggle in the classroom. For autistic students the classroom is confusing and can cause unnecessary stress. Students with special needs such as autism spectrum disorder may have problems with things like understanding instructions, listening following rules, changes to routines, transitions and friendships as well as other issues such as sensory processing, toileting, behavior and so on.

 

These issues will require special handling for the student with autism to feel comfortable in class and throughout the school day. Visual aids for autism can help alleviate many of these issues.


Visual aids for autism can make a huge difference to the student with autism and actually help them achieve their potential. For many autistic students using visual aids for autism such as social stories is a real benefit.


Generally teachers of autistic students will be aware of all autism classroom accommodations and will have taken their autistic students needs into account before the student with autism begins school. Many teachers of autistic students use social stories to help teach their student with autism appropriate social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors. As well as helping the student with autism cope with and understand the rules of school, as well as what is expected of them during the day, and what they can expect from others.


So let’s examine how do visual aids help special ed children – simply be making them more comfortable in and with situations, events and tasks they feel stressed by of fail to understand.


A social story is always written in the first person with visual cues and prompts appropriate to the skill or behavior being mastered. The social story is a visual step by step plan of a task broken down into small easily digestible chunks with focus being given to the key points the “social cues” which the student with autism can follow easily. They can be edited to suit individual needs and printed to make the accessible anywhere. So for example the social story can be used in the playground, outside school, in any class and so on in-fact anywhere it is needed to help support the autistic student.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autistic students and how do visual aids help special ed children, plus get a download of 48 social skills stories for autistic students visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources where you can download social skills stories for autistic students, quickly and easily.


Other sites offering social stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Resources and students with autism

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by significant deficits in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills, abilities and behaviors.

 

Students with autism spectrum disorder range in abilities and disabilities, from students with autism spectrum disorder that have severe intellectual disabilities to students that are intellectually gifted. With appropriate resources all students with autism can learn.

 

Although some autistic students may present educational disabilities and challenges, appropriate resources and students with autism can help them learn well, teacher implement systematic, and individualized teaching practices. As well as appropriate autistic resources such as PECS, daily schedules and social stories for autistic students.

 

Teachers of autistic students can help their autistic students by providing clear structure to the environment. Provide autistic resources and tools such as PECS, schedules and social stories ensure that the flow of lessons and activities is understandable and predictable.


Teachers of autistic students should have a clear focus on building and developing social and communication skills. This will help the student with autism develop skills for their current and future life in school, college, work, home, and community.


Students with autism display deficits in understanding and using speech as well as communication both verbal and non-verbal.


All autism classroom accommodations need to be expressed in a way that the student with autism can understand. This can be achieved through the use of schedules and social skills stories for autistic students.


Autistic children tend to be visual learners. In addition to providing autistic visual supports for understanding classroom expectations, many students with autism spectrum disorder will also need autistic visual supports to help them find means of communicating both verbally and non-verbally.

 

Generally all students with autism will have deficits with communication and may display difficulties expressing their needs and desires.


Teachers are finding the use of autistic visual supports such as social skills stories is helping students with autism cope within the school and classroom environment more efficiently. Social skills stories are actually helping students understand autism classroom accommodations easier as well as the rules of the school, plus what is expected of them throughout the day.

 

Social skills stories are used widely for autistic children and can now be downloaded straight from the internet. Sites offering autistic students school resources such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Are easy to navigate and offer excellent support to teachers of autistic students as well as parents and other professionals; resources and students with autism.

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories include:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school